Top tips for a healthy Easter

 

shutterstock_1676194471 easter family Mar21

For many of us, Easter can often be a time of more food indulgence than Christmas!  With a long weekend, school holidays, plus much-needed holidays planned, it can all amount to a lot more eating.

However, enjoying Easter fayre doesn’t have to mean making unhealthy food choices during the break. Here are many healthy swaps you can make which will be just as tasty.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five top ways of enjoying healthy Easter food.

 

Delicious asparagus sprinkled with Parmesan

Whilst all vegetables taste much better when eaten seasonally, asparagus stands out from the crowd in this respect.  Asparagus that has travelled halfway around the world to the supermarket storeroom is often tough and tasteless.  However, English asparagus is now just coming into season this Easter, and it is delicious!

Grilled,Green,Asparagus,With,Parmesan,Cheese

Asparagus boasts many health benefits. It’s high in energising B-vitamins, especially folate, vitamin C and other antioxidants.  Importantly, asparagus helps feed the good gut bacteria that is so critical our overall health.

Even better, it’s so simple and quick to cook.  Roast in the oven for around 10 minutes in a little olive oil and serve either as a starter or side sprinkled with Parmesan cheese. 

Easter pancakes for all the family

Children and adults alike love pancakes whatever time of year, so Easter is a great excuse to enjoy them.  What’s more, pancakes are great for fussy eaters because they provide an energy dense, protein-rich breakfast to keep sugar levels in check. It’s also another great way of encouraging the whole family to enjoy more fruit by adding some bananas and blueberries.

Pancakes,With,Berries,And,Maple,Syrup,For,Breakfast,On,A

And for those with sensitivities to gluten (or just wanting a different taste), why not make them with buckwheat? Despite its name, buckwheat is gluten-free and produces some very delicious, slightly nutty-flavoured pancakes.  Enjoy with fruit and a dollop of natural yoghurt.

Chocolate

It’s no surprise that there’s lots of chocolate around at Easter!  However, many people don’t realise that dark chocolate contains some great health benefits. Dark chocolate is packed with super-healthy polyphenols which are powerful antioxidants.  The polyphenols also help manage high blood pressure, as well as providing other health benefits.

Chocolate,Strawberries,With,Chocolate,Syrup,Close,Up

If you’re not quite ready to ditch the traditional milk chocolate Easter eggs, why not serve a slightly healthy dessert using strawberries dipped in melted chocolate.  That way, you’ll be doubling up on antioxidant power with the fruit and chocolate and will be supporting the immune system too.

Cruciferous vegetables

The family of cruciferous vegetables include Brussels sprouts, kale, broccoli, and cauliflower.  Whilst many will be happy to hear that Brussels are not in season right now, the traditional Easter Day roast could really benefit from some delicious cauliflower.

Baked,Cauliflower,Steaks,With,Herbs,And,Spices,On,Baking,Sheet

Cauliflower is a very healthy vegetable, containing loads of fibre, vitamins, and minerals, together with plant compounds that help protect the body from serious disease.

What to give your cauliflower some extra flavour?  Why not toss the heads in olive oil, lemon and crushed garlic and roast in the oven? Garlic is another superfood and is especially healthy for the heart and immune system.

You can have turkey at Easter too!

Many of us have been programmed to have turkey at Christmas time and rarely throughout the year.  However, over recent years, many people have taken the opportunity of enjoying turkey over the Easter holidays too.  And it will bring plenty of health benefits.

Stuffed,Turkey,Breast,With,Baked,Vegetables,And,Spices,On,A

Turkey is naturally low in fat, so it wins hands down when put alongside traditional Spring lamb. Plus, turkey is slightly lower in calories but higher in protein than chicken. It also contains much more of the immune-boosting mineral zinc than chicken. A turkey crown is an even lighter option, with very little fat and no wastage.

Have a wonderfully, healthy Easter and enjoy some of these delicious and nutritious foods along the way!

Stay well.

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Five ways to eat better and care for the planet

World,Vegetable,Day,,Vegetable,On,The,World,,Fresh,Vegetable,,Vegan

We are all very much aware of the need to be more environmentally conscious, and this is becoming more critical than ever.  Equally, our health is very important too.  The great news is that we can look after both

The environment and our health are certainly linked and there a few things that you can do to support your diet and the planet.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her top five ways to eat for a healthier planet and body too!

 

Buy local

If you can, it’s always best to buy from your local farm shops or farmer’s markets.  This way, the carbon footprint of foods will be much reduced.  And whilst it’s not always easy to find organic fruits and vegetables (plus they are often more expensive), there’s no doubt that the less pesticides used on foods, the better for your body and the planet.

Cartoon,Outdoor,Store,On,Green,Background,In,Flat,Style

Produce that has been mass-produced, shipped around the world, and then stored for long periods in supermarket warehouses, loses nutrient value.  The quicker the harvest to mouth the better, plus fruits and vegetables are much tastier when freshly eaten. Furthermore, you can generally buy these foods at local farmer’s markets or in farm shops free from plastic packaging which is also a massive plus for the environment.

Go for seasonal colour

Eating a diet that’s rich in colourful, in-season fruit and vegetables not only means you’re focussing on plant-based meals, but colour equals nutrients, which in turn brings better health.

Set,Of,Fresh,Healthy,Vegetables,,Fruits,And,Berries,Isolated.,Flat

It’s not always easy to eat the recommended 5 portions of fruits and vegetables a day.  So, instead just look at the colour on your plate. Adding roasted veggies to a bowl of quinoa provides a colourful and highly nutritious meal which includes plenty of protein too.

Love your plants

There’s certainly been a massive increase in people opting for vegetarian and vegan diets.  Indeed, around 7.2 million people in the UK are currently following a meat-free diet.  There are also many more people following a flexitarian diet, meaning some meals are only plant-based and others contain products from animals.

Set,Vegan,Sources,Of,Protein,Fresh,Organic,Vegetarian,Food,Collection

Whichever way we cut it, including more plant-based foods in the diet is great for the environment and the body too.  Just as one example, plant-based foods are rich in polyphenols; antioxidant-rich foods that are nutrient-dense.  Eating more plant-based meals is going to help the body to both fight illnesses and protect it from some of our most common degenerative diseases.

Foods such as beans and grains are high in fibre which not only helps with weight management but keeps the digestive system running smoothly too.  If you’re not quite ready to give up all animal produce, why not have at least three days a week of just eating plant-based foods?

Be sustainable

We hear the word ‘sustainable’ used very often.  It’s frequently associated with fresh fish and fish products.  Our fish stocks are diminishing, partly because they are not being caught in a sustainable way.  It’s important, therefore, to look for products and produce that are sustainable to protect food sources for future generations.

Green,Energy,Concept,,Tiny,People,Saving,Earth,Environment,Together,,Cartoon

The foods we eat, and how much we eat, directly affects food sustainability and as the population increases, demand will increase on food production. It’s also worth bearing in mind that beef and fish production produce many more greenhouse gases than certain plant-based foods, which is having a huge impact on the environment and, consequently, food sustainability.

The more mindful we can all be as individuals, and the more steps (however small) we each take, we can all make a difference to help future generations.

Eat as nature intended

One of the many issues associated with the typical western diet is that it is heavily processed.  This is not only bad for the environment, but also for the body.  Processed foods are lower in nutrients, have reduced fibre, and are often high in sugar, salt, and sweeteners.  This provides the body with more challenges when having to deal with chemically processed foods.

Vegetables,On,Blue,Background,,Top,View,,Healthy,Food,Concept,,Round

The nearer we can eat foods to their natural state the better.  Try to plan meals using fresh ingredients in their natural state.  As an example, always choose whole grains rather than white processed ones such as white rice, white pasta, or white bread.  Include as many colourful fruits and vegetables as possible and steam or stir fry them. And resist buying ready meals which often contain additional ingredients which provide little nutritional benefit.

So, look after your body and the environment with a few simple tips for a more sustainable diet this season.

Stay well.

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Seasonal Eating: what to eat this spring

Fresh,Ripe,Asparagus,With,Sunny,,Vivid,,Hard,Light,And,Shadows.

Spring is my favourite time of the year!  Everything feels fresh and new, the days are longer and brighter and there is a great sense of looking forward to summer and being outdoors more.

Importantly too, spring brings some great foods, and they are some of my favourites.

Let me share these delicious spring foods with you as well as the nutritional and health benefits they provide.

 

Strawberries

Whilst we tend to associate strawberries with the summer and Wimbledon, they actually start coming into season during springtime.  Not only do they taste delicious, especially if you buy them freshly picked from a farmer’s market, they have some amazing health benefits too.

Strawberry.,Pattern,Of,Strawberrys,On,Colored,Background.

The rich dark pigments of strawberries signal that this fruit is loaded with protective antioxidants. Whilst they offer a wide range of benefits, they’re especially good for heart health.  Additionally, they help regulate blood sugar balance so are great if you’re wanting to lose weight, and their polyphenol content helps prevent unwanted diseases.

I love them just as they are but they’re also great with a little natural yoghurt, making a perfect breakfast and start to the day.

Asparagus

For some reason, asparagus isn’t everyone’s favourite vegetable.  Perhaps it’s because I know the wonderful health benefits of asparagus that makes me love it more! It’s high in antioxidants, immune boosting vitamin C and vitamin E, plus vitamin K which is needed for healthy bones and blood.

Fresh,Green,Asparagus,Pattern,,Top,View.,Isolated,Over,Green.,Food

I often recommend including asparagus in your diet because of its prebiotic fibre, feeding all the good bacteria that works so hard in the gut to keep us healthy. However, I also love the taste of asparagus, but only when it’s in season, otherwise it can be tough and tasteless.

Asparagus is great barbecued with halloumi cheese, or simply steamed, drizzled with a little butter, and sprinkled with Parmesan cheese.

Celeriac

Whilst I adore celeriac, I don’t eat it often enough because it’s not that easy to prepare!  In fact, its often called ‘the ugly one’ because of its knobbly appearance.  However, if you’ve got a sharp enough peeler, preparing celeriac is not difficult. It can then be boiled and mashed or blended into soups or casseroles.  Whilst it’s closely related to celery, the taste of celeriac is much more palatable and nuttier.

Celeriac

Celeriac has an impressive nutrient profile, being low in fat, but high in immune-boosting vitamin C and vitamin B6, together with vitamin K and manganese for great bone health. What’s not to love!

Crab

Crab is, of course, a strong-flavoured fish but is very versatile, so can be used in many ways.  Freshly caught and prepared, it is a real treat, especially if you eat it in places traditionally known for their crab. Cromer crab is a certainly one of my favourites!

Crab,Meat,Fried,Basil,On,Orange,Color,Background

Whilst it’s fairly low in fat, crab does contain good amounts of the super-healthy omega-3 fats which are essential for the heart, joints, heart, eyes, hormones, and skin. Crab also contains plenty of vitamins, minerals, and protein so it will keep you feeling fuller for longer.

Spring Lamb

Whilst I don’t eat much red meat, lamb is certainly top of my list and the taste of spring lamb is especially delicious. As with all red meat, lamb is a great source of iron, so really helps my energy levels. Plus, it’s high in B-vitamins, again great for energy, but also immunity and is a fantastic source of protein.

Lamb

Eating sufficient protein throughout the day, from a range of sources, is essential to keep blood sugar levels in balance.  Protein becomes even more important as we get older to help keep bones strong and prevent muscle wastage.  Losing muscle mass doesn’t need to be a ‘given’ as we age if we take good care of protein intake.

Easter is synonymous with lamb and is certainly a popular choice in many homes as a traditional roast on Easter Sunday.  Cook with plenty of fresh rosemary which is loaded with protective antioxidants, and garlic which is great for digestion and the immune system too.

I really hope you’ll love these spring foods as much as I do!

Stay well.

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Create your healthiest festive menu yet! Top tips for your Christmas Dinner

A family eating christmas dinner

When it comes to Christmas menus, they are often a mix of healthy and not so healthy dishes; it is the season of treats after all!

However, there are so many foods on the traditional festive menus that are great for supporting wellbeing. Even better, they are delicious!

 

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five delicious and healthy festive foods.

Turkey

Turkey has more nutritional benefits than chicken in many respects. Importantly, it is higher in protein and lower in fat than chicken. However, with both meats, it’s important to avoid eating the skin as this is where most of the fat sits and there are no further benefits to eating it (apart from the taste of crispy skin which many of us love!)

Roast Christmas turkey

From an immune-boosting perspective, turkey contains one third more zinc than chicken, and this is especially rich in the dark meat. Turkey also provides all of the energising B vitamins, together with potassium which is great for the heart, and phosphorus which is essential for healthy bones. There’s no need for any guilt when loading up your Christmas meal plate with turkey!

Red cabbage

Any vegetable or fruit that is deep in colour is rich in nutrients, and red cabbage is no exception. Red cabbage is loaded with disease-preventing antioxidants.

Red cabbage stewed with apples

However, all cabbage provides a plethora of nutrients including vitamin C, vitamin E and vitamin K. Uniquely, cabbage also contains a compound called S-Methylmethionine which has been found to help heal stomach ulcers and soothe pain in the gut. And if you’re struggling with acid reflux during the festive season, which is very common, then drinking raw cabbage juice will certainly help. However, there’s no problem with adding some beetroot and apple to make the juice more palatable and even healthier.

Red cabbage makes a delicious addition to any Christmas menu, prepared with apples, raisins, cinnamon, and bay leaves.

Parsnips

No Christmas menu is complete without the addition of parsnips. This slightly sweet root vegetable can be eaten instead, or in addition to, potatoes and provides a great source of fibre. Parsnips are also rich in folate, essential for the production of healthy red blood cells, and help support lung health. Additionally, they contain plenty of potassium which helps reduce blood pressure.

A bowl of roast parsnips

Parsnips clearly deliver on health and taste and are great roasted and flavoured with garlic, Parmesan cheese or coriander. Indeed, they also make a fabulous Boxing Day spicy soup with both turmeric and cumin providing the warming and delicious spices.

Cranberry sauce

Whilst cranberries can be rather sharp and sour in taste, used in cranberry sauce they certainly come alive. And they still deliver on health, providing plenty of anthocyanins – antioxidants that protect the liver from free radical damage. Even better, these antioxidants also have a protective effect on overall health.

CRanberry sauce in small ceramic jug and cranberries on wooden board

Cranberries are also well-known for their ability to help prevent and treat urinary tract infections because they stop any bacteria from hanging around internally.

Every turkey needs some accompaniments and cranberry sauce provides a very worthy and healthy partner.

Chestnuts

No nut conjures up feelings of Christmas more than chestnuts! If you’re lucky enough to have an open fire, then you can’t miss out on roasting these delicious nuts. And once they’re roasted, chestnuts are certainly easier to extract from their outer shell.

Chestnuts are naturally rich in immune-boosting zinc, energising iron and bone-loving manganese. They are also rich in complex carbs so will certainly hit the spot if you’re feeling in need of a snack between meals.

Roasted,Chestnuts,On,An,Old,Board.,Selective,Focus.

 

Of course, chestnut is the main event in chestnut stuffing which can quite happily be vegan with the addition of mushrooms, onions, garlic, oregano, and sage. All these additional ingredients provide immune-boosting antioxidants, and plenty of warming herbs to help protect the body against any nasty viruses floating around.

And chestnuts don’t just need to feature in savoury recipes; they work really well with chocolate made into a cake or as a cream to pour over some decadent poached pears (also now in season).

So, enjoy your festive feast and include some of these health-giving foods for an extra wellbeing boost!

 

Stay well.

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Seasonal Eating: What to eat in December

A table laid with christmas foods including turkey, cake, cheese and decorations

The festive season is upon us which brings its own traditional food choices during this period.  However, as always, it’s good to eat foods that are naturally in season as they are at their best.

And some of these can certainly feature as part of your Christmas menu.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five top seasonal foods for December.

 

 

Turnips

For some reason turnips don’t seem to get the same accolades as parsnips.  Perhaps it’s because turnips were traditionally grown as cattle fodder in the nineteenth century. And whilst turnips are generally available all year, they are at their tastiest right now.

Rustic,Organic,Turnips,With,Fresh,Green,Tops,And,Roots,On

From a nutritional perspective, they provide a range of nutrients including immune-boosting vitamin C, hormone balancing vitamin B6 and bone-loving calcium and manganese.  Importantly, and just like all members of the brassica family, turnips contain indoles which ramp up liver detoxification enzymes, perfect for this time of year.

Turnips can be baked just like potatoes, with some thyme, and are delicious sprinkled with a little parmesan cheese.

Apples

Whilst the nutritional benefits of apples are never in question, they can be quite confusing to choose from as there are over 7,000 varieties! But which ever ones you choose they provide some great health benefits.

Apples made into a heart shape on a wooden background

Apples are prized for their pectin content. Pectin is a gentle form of soluble fibre hence apples have traditionally been used to treat constipation.  Importantly, pectin helps remove ‘bad‘ cholesterol from the blood stream, making apples a heart-healthy choice.

Apples are also higher in fructose than glucose which means they’re lower on the glycaemic index and help to balance blood sugar levels. This is also important when keeping a watchful eye on the waistband.  Apples are also a rich source of vitamin C to give the immune system a much-needed boost at this time of year.

Jerusalem Artichoke

Interestingly, they are not from Jerusalem and are also not part of the artichoke family! However, I frequently write about Jerusalem artichokes because they are some of the best vegetables to feed the beneficial bacteria in the gut.

Close up of artichokes

Just like a garden, the gut microbiome needs to be cultivated and fed and this vegetable is great for the purpose. They are rich in inulin which is known as prebiotic bacteria. As with all vegetables they’re also rich in vitamin C and potassium. Jerusalem artichokes make a delicious side dish simply roasted with or without the skin.

Kale

Interestingly kale is not only in season at this time of year, but also definitely much tastier too! Kale is a member of the Brassica family and provides amazing health benefits, especially in protecting the liver, but also providing compounds to protect future health too.

shutterstock_192761054 bowl of kale Apr15

From an antioxidant perspective, kale delivers on vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin E, hence its role in protecting current and future health. It is also rich in key minerals such as manganese, iron, and calcium, all generally lacking in the typical UK diet and essential for the heart and bones, amongst other things.

Kale can be slightly bitter so is best sauteed with a little garlic and soy sauce to make a delicious side.

Potatoes

Potatoes often get bad press, especially from people following the ketogenic diet as they are obviously high in carbs.  However, boiled potatoes are lower on the glycaemic index than jackets, therefore their starch content is less.

a basket of jersey royal potatoes

Importantly, potatoes provide a great and inexpensive energy source so are great for feeding and satisfying families.  They also contain plenty of vitamin C and if eaten with the skin, provide a great source of fibre.

If you’re looking for a festive treat, then dauphinoise potatoes, made with cream, garlic and cheese is one of the most delicious ways you’ll ever eat them!

So, enjoy all that nature has to offer this season and grab some great health benefits too!

Stay well.

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Seasonal eating: top foods for September

Ripe,Pears,And,Peaches,On,Table

As a nutritionist, I am frequently talking about eating with the seasons.  This means eating foods at the times nature intended during the year, which generally delivers better nutrient content, enhanced flavours, and greater health benefits.

However, we can sometimes run out of ideas as to what to do with these delicious foods.

Read on for some great suggestions on how best to use my favourite in-season foods right now!

Blackberries

During August and September, the hedgerows are awash with beautiful blackberries, signalling the perfect time for eating this nutrient-dense fruit.

As with all berries, blackberries are loaded with immune-boosting vitamin C and antioxidants, as well as energising folate. They also provide a good source of fibre.  Furthermore, they are low on the glycaemic index so won’t upset blood sugar balance and are great if you’re trying to lose weight.

shutterstock_206260981 blackberries Aug15

As vitamin C is degraded by cooking, fruit is generally at its most nutritious when eaten raw, so why not load some up onto your breakfast muesli or simply enjoy with some natural yoghurt.  And if you can ‘pick your own’ blackberries, or scavenge them from the hedgerows, the taste and nutritional benefit is going to be even better!

Beetroot

Another colourful beauty, beetroot scores highly on both taste and nutritional benefits.  Beetroot is rich in potassium which helps regulate blood pressure but also contains betacyanin which is great for cleansing the liver and supporting any detox plan.  However, as beetroots are quite sweet, many people prefer them pickled but this does reduce their nutrient content somewhat.

Whole beetroots

Beetroots are also rich in immune-boosting beta-carotene, which becomes more bioavailable when beetroots are cooked.  They can therefore be boiled in their skins and then peeled and used in a variety of ways.

The taste and texture of beetroot works especially well with goat’s cheese.  Enjoy the last days of summer by making up a delicious and simple goat’s cheese salad, with chopped beetroot and sprinkled with balsamic glaze.

Celeriac

Often, and very unkindly referred to as ‘the ugly one’ due to its knobbly appearance, celeriac redeems itself with its nutritional goodness and likeable flavour.  Part of the celery family, celeriac has a better taste profile down to its nutty flavour rather than being overly salty.  However, just like celery, celeriac is great for reducing blood pressure and is a good source of vitamin C and fibre.

Celeriac on a table

Celeriac makes a great vegetable side, simply mashed with a little pepper and butter, or mashed with potatoes and garlic. Why not try making it into a soup with apples to create a really balanced and delicious flavour.

Pears

Pears are often forgotten and pushed into the shade by their counterparts, apples, although they bare no relation to each other. Just like apples though, pears are also relatively low on the glycaemic index so are great if you’re watching the kilos.  Importantly though, they are one of the least allergenic foods so are perfect for including in allergy-free diets or for weaning babies. Plus, they are high in the soluble fibre pectin, so are great for keeping the bowels running smoothly.

shutterstock_298111103 pears Sept17

As with many fruits, pears work really well with various cheeses, especially the stronger flavoured ones such as gorgonzola. They are delicious poached in red wine (packed with healthy antioxidants) or paired with chocolate as a real treat.

Peaches

Peaches are loaded with vitamin C, fibre, and potassium.  And just like beetroot, peaches are rich in beta-carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A as required.  Vitamin A is essential for a healthy immune system and for good vision, especially at night.

shutterstock_297863489 peaches July16

Peaches are delicious when eaten simply on their own as a low-calorie snack.  And it’s worth remembering that tinned peaches, which are highly popular, lose most of their vitamin C in the canning process and are also much higher in sugar.  Fresh is always best!

So, enjoy the seasonal delights that September brings and get creative!

Stay well.

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Herbal health: which herbs to include in your diet this summer

A range of fresh herbs in pots to add to cooking

Nature has provided us with a wealth of amazing herbs, which all have wonderful medicinal benefits, but equally add real and varied tastes to our cooking.

Adding herbs to dishes doesn’t need to be complicated and the good news is that you can’t really get it wrong!

 

Suzie Sawyer, Clinical Nutritionist, shares her five favourite herbs, when to use them and their health benefits.

Rosemary

One of my all-time favourite herbs, rosemary is not only a great source of health-giving antioxidants but delivers an amazing flavour to a range of recipes.

Rosemary,Bound,On,A,Wooden,Board

Rosemary naturally contains anti-inflammatory compounds, so it is great if you’re struggling with aching joints and muscles.  Additionally, it exerts really positive effects on the circulation and especially circulation to the brain, providing a great boost for cognition. Furthermore, rosemary is great for supporting the immune system; it’s array of health benefits goes on and on!

Rosemary works really well with many vegetable dishes, especially roasted potatoes or sweet potatoes, and is fabulous accompaniment to roast lamb. Enjoy it all year round!

Basil

Basil always reminds me of the Mediterranean because it’s a firm favourite of the Italians but also throughout the Mediterranean countries.  Basil adds so much to so many dishes.  However, it’s always best added towards the end of cooking or as you’re serving a pasta dish as basil’s taste gets lost when over-cooked.

A fresh bunch of basil on a wooden board

Basil seems to have positive effects on blood pressure and reducing blood fats (perhaps another reason why the typical Mediterranean diet is so healthy).  It can therefore be used liberally and works well with fresh ‘on the vine’ tomatoes and mozzarella cheese.  In fact, there’s not a recipe with tomatoes that basil doesn’t work with!

Coriander

Also known as cilantro, this delightful herb is usually best served with spicy dishes, especially Asian and Indian curries: both the leaves and seeds are used in cooking.

shutterstock_446722957 coriander Apr18

However, leaves tend to be used more frequently and just like basil they are best added as the dish is being served to preserve their flavour.  Coriander brings a wealth of health benefits especially for reducing blood pressure and generally protecting the heart’s wellbeing. It can also help to boost immunity and provides antioxidant protection.  This in itself further aids the immune system but also helps protect the body against degenerative diseases.

Add coriander to any curry, stir-fry or spicy soup and it will never disappoint.

Chives

Chives are a member of the allium family alongside onions, leaks and garlic, hence its similar taste. And just like its family members, chive has natural antiparasitic effects, so is really helpful for stomach issues.  Even better, it has a much gentler flavour than onions or garlic and is easier to digest.

Bunch,Of,Fresh,Chives,On,A,Wooden,Cutting,Board,,Selective

As with most deep green herbs and vegetables, chives are rich in vitamin K which is essential for healthy bones and the heart, as well as having plentiful antioxidants.  They are really easily chopped and added on the top of baked potatoes, potato salad or any egg dish.  They are also really easily grown in a pot on the windowsill, so you need never be without them!

Parsley

Parsley often gets dismissed as a cooking ingredient and is often only used to garnish dishes.  However, its distinctive peppery flavour works so well in loads of salad dishes as well as recipes containing fish. And just to confuse matters, there are various types of parsley with the flat-leaf variety being the most flavoursome. However, it’s all down to personal preference.

A bunch of fresh parsley

Parsley is a brilliant detoxifier of the liver, so it is great to add fresh parsley liberally to any dish.  Parsley is also a rich source of chlorophyll (also called the ‘blood of life’) because it delivers so many nutrients, as well as being a great blood cleanser.

With so much goodness in these wonderful herbs, not to mention fabulous flavours, start revving up your dishes and health today!

Stay well.

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Seasonal nutrition: what to eat in August

People enjoying al fresco eating in the summer

With so many of us enjoying staycations in the UK this year, it provides the perfect opportunity for us to fully enjoy all the glorious foods currently in season right here.

Everything tastes better when we eat foods at the time of year nature intended.  In fact, foods tend to come into season at exactly the right time for our bodies to gain the most benefits from their nutrients when we need them.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer gives us a taste of what’s on offer this season.

Runner beans

With so many people now enjoying ‘growing their own’ in allotments or gardens, runner beans are a great ‘go-to’ vegetable.  After the initial work involved of creating a support network for the growing beans, the results are well worth the effort.

A bunch of runner beans on a wooden background

Runner beans are closely related to other beans, referred to as legumes, including black and pinto, but contain less calories.  And whilst they all contain some of the same nutrients, the greenness of runner beans means their chlorophyll content is high.  Chlorophyll is often referred to as the ‘blood of life’ because it helps to naturally cleanse the blood but also provides a range of vitamins and minerals.

Runner beans also deliver a good source of vitamin C and bone and heart-loving vitamin K.  However, their overall strong nutrient content can be easily diminished from over cooking, therefore lightly steaming is always best and will retain their crispness.

Globe artichokes

Whilst not always the quickest of vegetables to prepare, artichokes deliver some wonderful and unique health benefits, so patience will be rewarded.  Globe artichokes need the tough outer leaves removed, together with the inedible fibrous ‘choke’ in the middle, revealing the edible heart. The active compound in artichokes is called cynarin which is great at detoxifying the liver.  Research also suggests they are supportive of heart health, helping reduce cholesterol levels and blood pressure.

Close up of artichokes

Importantly, artichokes help replenish the friendly gut bacteria that is so essential for good overall health.  They need around 30 minutes of gentle boiling until softened and when cooled are great simply served with vinaigrette and lemon juice. Alternatively, they’re delicious grilled when cut in half lengthways.

Mackerel

Mackerel is often referred to as a very ‘fishy’ fish because it has a strong flavour. Mackerel is a fantastic source of the super-healthy omega-3 fats.  The body can’t make omega-3s, so they must be eaten regularly in the diet, and we know that as a nation we are incredibly deficient. Omega-3s are needed for a healthy heart, brain, eyes, hormones, and joints so they’re pretty important!  It is recommended that we eat at least two portions of oily fish per week to get what the body needs.

Fresh mackerel with lemon and herbs on foil ready to be baked

Mackerel is often sourced in UK waters or from the North Atlantic or Mediterranean.  It’s strong flavour, and oily texture, means it can be simply served with lemon and herbs or with a fresh salad that includes sweet tomatoes.

Plaice

Whilst plaice is available throughout the year, it is generally much fleshier and tastier at this time of year.  As with all white fish, plaice is a great source of low-fat protein and is great for easy everyday meals grilled with other flavours.  Indeed, since it has a subtle taste, it works well with stronger flavours of olives, tomatoes, spring onions, rosemary, and chives.

Thai fish dish

Plaice is also a good source of the mineral iodine which is often deficient in women and is essential for the growth of babies and children as well as being well utilised for cognitive function.  Plaice certainly provides a low-cost, easy, and nutritious food option this season.

Plums

The season for plums is short so they need to be grabbed and enjoyed whilst they’re around.  There are over 300 varieties of plum available, but it’s always good to choose the sweetest ones to avoid having to add too much additional sugar to a dish.

A bowl full of plums

Their beautiful orange flesh signals plenty of beta-carotene which is turned into immune-boosting vitamin A as needed by the body. Plus, they’re rich in vitamin C and also tryptophan from which our body makes our happy hormone ‘serotonin’ – that’s something to smile about for sure! Even better, plums work really well in sweet or savoury dishes; try them in a crumble, with chicken, or simply poached with cinnamon and honey.

Many people perhaps don’t realise that prunes are dried plums, and both are therefore rich in essential fibre.

So, why not visit some local markets or farm shops this August and be sure to enjoy the season whilst it’s here!

Stay well.

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Buying local: what to eat in August

shutterstock_141202630 local farmers market July20

Buying and eating locally sourced fruits and vegetables in season is great for health, the economy, and the environment. Even more importantly, eating food in season generally provides a lot more ‘bang for your buck’ nutrient-wise.

Whether you have a local farm shop, a farmer’s market or locally sourced fruits and vegetables in a shop nearby, eating with the seasons as nature intended is something to consider as we move through the year.

This National Allotments Week, Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares five fruits and vegetables in season, ripe and ready to eat right now!

Raspberries

The beautiful deep pink colour of raspberries is what provides a wealth of antioxidants and other plant compounds that are hugely protective of health. Raspberries are also loaded with immune-boosting vitamin C and beta-carotene, which is turned into vitamin A in the body as needed. Eaton Mess never tasted so good!

A punnet of fresh raspberries

Also, of note is ellagic acid which is especially high in raspberries with an overwhelming amount of antioxidant properties.  Even better, it has been found to increase libido. What’s not to like!

Turnips

Whilst we don’t generally think of warming foods during the summer months, turnips are coming into season right now ready for the colder months approaching. However, don’t wait until the weather cools to enjoy these delicious and highly nutritious root veggies.

Rustic,Organic,Turnips,With,Fresh,Green,Tops,And,Roots,On

Turnips were traditionally grown as cattle fodder. However, turnips are part of the highly prized cruciferous vegetable family, rich in indoles that are very protective of health, helping with hormone balancing, together with vitamin B6. Turnips are delicious simply roasted and sprinkled with Parmesan and thyme.

Peaches

Peaches have been grown in the UK for over a thousand years and at their ripest they are supremely juicy! There are hundreds of varieties – nectarines are actually a smooth-skinned peach. As with all fruits and vegetables that are orange, they contain plenty of immune-boosting beta-carotene. This carotenoid is also very protective of the skin, hence it’s no coincidence that they are at their best during the summer months.

shutterstock_297863489 peaches July16

Peaches are also high in potassium which can help support heart health and reduce blood pressure. Peaches actually pair really well with raspberries in a Peach Melba with Raspberry Coulis, or on their own, simply spiced with some cinnamon.

Broad Beans

Whilst they may not be at the top of everyone’s shopping list, partly because they can be bitter and tough, when fresh, and bought from a farmer’s market, broad beans are crisp and delicious. A typical Mediterranean vegetable, they work especially well with pork-based meats such as pancetta or chorizo.

Broad beans in a bowl

As with all beans, they’re a great source of protein and fibre, but also vitamin A, vitamin C, iron, and potassium.  And if you’re struggling with low mood, you might want to add some broad beans to your plate as they contain L-dopa, which is used by the body to produce our feel-good neurotransmitter, dopamine.

Sweetcorn

Traditionally, sweetcorn was first grown and eaten by the Mexicans and Americans, hence corn on the cob is frequently found on their restaurant menus. Sweetcorn is a form of maize and as such is a staple crop both here and there. And whilst sweetcorn isn’t necessarily the most nutrient dense vegetable, it still provides useful amounts of immune-boosting vitamins A and C.

Fresh,Corn,On,Cobs,On,Rustic,Wooden,Table,,Closeup

Sweetcorn is also rich in fibre so is great for digestive health and, unusually for a vegetable, is high in vitamin B3, essential for good nervous system function. It’s certainly best eaten simply as corn on the cob, rolled in a little butter and black pepper.

Seek out your local farmer’s market or farm shop for the healthiest and freshest fruits and vegetables in season right now.

Stay well.

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How to pack a healthy picnic

A picnic basket on a wodden table overlooking a beautiful countryside scene

It’s a National Picnic Week which means it’s a great time to celebrate everything we love about picnics as well as spending time outdoors in green spaces.

There’s always a great temptation to pack too many ‘treats’ into the picnic basket but there are some great ways to get nutrition without missing out on flavours.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five healthy picnic swaps, but which don’t swap out the taste!

Swap white for brown

This includes using brown bread or wraps rather than white if you’re packing sandwiches, but also wholemeal pasta rather than white. White bread and pasta have been refined, meaning much of the healthy fibre, essential for good digestion,  been stripped away. So too have many of the nutrients, especially energising B-vitamins and essential minerals such as chromium.

Sandwich,With,Ham,tomato,,Cucumber,And,Arugula,On,The,Wooden,Cutting

Brown pasta has a much fuller flavour and more of a texture than white.  And pasta salads are great for taking on picnics.  Why not try beetroot and cold poached salmon wholemeal pasta, adding some avocado, cucumber, dill and a little natural yoghurt.  This is a really delicious super-food pasta salad.

Swap potato crisps for veggie crisps

Most picnic baskets include crisps in some shape or size. Unfortunately, potato crisps are generally high in fat and low in nutrients.  So, why not swap potato crisps for veggie crisps? Think beetroot, parsnip, or carrot (or all three?) – there are a lot of veggie ‘crisp’ options available in supermarkets.

Home made kale chips in a dish

Even better, make your own kale crisps.  Kale belongs to the super-healthy cruciferous vegetable family which are high in heart-loving vitamin K, relaxing magnesium and are loaded with antioxidants.  Simply pull off the leaves and rub them in a little olive oil and salt. Then roast in the oven for around 10 minutes and once cooled, you’ll have some of the healthiest veggie crisps to take on your picnic.

Swap ham for turkey

If you’re taking sandwiches, then what you put into them can make all the difference.  Ham sandwiches are often popular in the picnic basket.  However, ham is a processed meat and generally also contains high levels of preservatives.  Ham also contains saturated fats which are best minimised in the diet.

Grilled,Turkey,Breast,With,Salad

A far better choice is to use turkey meat instead. Turkey is very low in fat and high in protein (at 31 g per 100g, more than chicken). Why not cook up some turkey breast steaks the day before, which can be quickly grilled.  If you cook a few extra, they’re delicious eaten with Jersey Royal potatoes (now in season) and salad.  For the picnic, turkey steaks can be chopped, mixed with a little pesto and tomatoes, and made into delicious brown bread sandwiches.

Swap cheese spread for nut butters

There is a plethora of ready-made cheese spreads in supermarkets.  Whilst they might taste good, they are high in fat and are not especially nutrient dense.  Why not swap these for some delicious omega-3 laden almond butter.  Omega-3 fats are essential and whilst we need to be mindful of the amount of saturated fats we consume, the omegas are seriously deficient within the UK population and are essential for the heart, brain, eyes, skin and hormones.

Nut butter on rye bread

Almond butter is also high in protein so will keep energy levels sustained throughout the day. Why not add some watercress (one of the healthiest salad vegetables around) for colour and a nutrient blast?

Swap fizzy drinks for kombucha

Fizzy drinks are always popular on picnics.  However, they are certainly not the healthiest of drinks.  Sugar-free versions are packed with sweeteners which have a detrimental effect on mood, but also encourage cravings for sweet food so you still end up eating all the wrong things!

Kombucha,Second,Fermented,Fruit,Tea,With,Different,Flavorings.,Healthy,Natural

Kombucha, however, is a great alternative. It’s a fermented, lightly effervescent, green or black tea drink, which is low in sugar but high in health benefits.  Fermented foods and drinks provide probiotics which are great for feeding the good bacteria and are essential for healthy digestion, good mood and effective weight management. Once you’ve tried them, there’ll be no turning back!

So, get outdoors and celebrate National Picnic Week with these super-healthy food swaps.  Enjoy!

Stay well.

FOR MORE GREAT DIET AND LIFESTYLE ADVICE:

Sign up to receive our blog and get a weekly dose of the latest nutrition, health and wellness advice direct to your inbox.

Follow us on Twitter @feelaliveuk for nutrition, lifestyle and well-being tips.

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Follow and Chat with Suzie on Twitter @nutritionsuzie

For everything you need to know about vitamins, minerals and herbs visit our sister site Herbfacts

All images: Shutterstock