Five immune-boosting nutrients to get you ready for the cold season

With the winter months fast approaching, the season for bugs looms large. Thankfully nature has provided us with a wealth of nutrients to help fend off colds and flu. Whilst vitamin C and the mineral zinc are well-known as great immune-boosters there are 5 other key nutrients which are essential to keep you fighting fit this winter.

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares these five top immune-boosting nutrients!

SMALLER--4 Suzie Blog pic

VITAMIN D

Vitamin D tends to be associated with healthy bones and teeth, but it is also a key player in the health of the immune system.  Vitamin D is fondly known as the ‘sunshine’ vitamin because it’s primarily made on the skin in the presence of sunlight. So during the winter months, people living in the Northern Hemisphere, including the UK, are likely to be deficient.  This is the very reason that Public Health England recommend supplementation of Vitamin D for everyone, particularly during the winter.

So how does it work?  It would seem that vitamin D activates a key part of the immune system – the killer T-cells – that detect unwanted viruses and bacteria.  T-cells rely on vitamin D in order to activate, otherwise they would remain dormant.

As well as taking a supplement of vitamin D this winter, eat plenty of oily fish, particularly those containing small bones such as sardines, pilchards and mackerel.  However whilst they provide some vitamin D, they may not be sufficient to keep your immune system in tip-top shape all winter-long so supplementation is recommended.

FRIENDLY BACTERIA

You may be surprised to know that your gut is home to 70% of your immune system.  It’s actually the body’s largest protective barrier between you and the outside world, and these defences come in the form of beneficial, friendly bacteria or probiotics.

One of the most prevalent strains of friendly bacteria is lactobacillus acidophilus, which is often found in yoghurt with active cultures. Probiotics need feeding to be as efficient as possible. Foods such as Jerusalem artichokes, garlic, onions, lentils, oats and bananas will all feed these good guys and boost your immune system at the same time. You can also try a good quality probiotic supplement.

VITAMIN B6

Women in particular may associate vitamin B6 with supporting good hormone balance, but it also plays an important role in the immune system.  Vitamin B6 helps to increase antibody reactions which fight infections, and also stimulates the production of T-cells.

 

The good news is that vitamin B6 is rarely deficient in the diet.  However, increasing intake is going to have a positive effect on the immune system.  Avocados (great on toast for breakfast), bananas (an excellent afternoon snack), salmon (also packed with health-giving omega-3 fats), and foods containing wholegrain flour (such as whole wheat bread) provide excellent amounts of vitamin B6.

BETA-CAROTENE (Vitamin A)

Beta-carotene is turned into vitamin A in the body when needed, which is essential for the health of the immune system as well as vision and cell integrity.

Vitamin A itself is mainly available in animal produce such as meat, liver, eggs, butter and cheese, so vegetarian and vegans may be lacking. However, beta-carotene is widely available in lots of brightly coloured fruits and vegetables including carrots, butternut squash, broccoli, kale and cantaloupe melon.

Beta carotene is converted into vitamin A when needed but it does require sufficient protein, zinc and vitamin C to do so.  A diet rich in brightly coloured fruits and vegetables, plus adequate protein either from animal or vegetable sources, together with some nuts and seeds will ensure beta-carotene can carry out its work most effectively.

VITAMIN E

As with a number of other nutrients, vitamin E improves B-cell and T-cell function (both key parts of the immune system). It also protects white blood cells from damage.  However, just like many other nutrients, vitamin E doesn’t work in isolation; it works hand-in-hand with selenium.

Luckily wheat germ and whole wheat flour both contain good amounts of these two nutrients so try to include these in your diet. Avocados, sunflower seeds and oils are all great sources of vitamin E.

As we know, when it comes to nutrients, nothing works in isolation in nature. Therefore eating a colourful ‘rainbow’ coloured diet every day is going to go a long way to keeping the bugs at bay this winter.

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Warming seasonal food: delicious and nutritious autumn dishes

With summer now quite a way behind us, and the nights’ drawing in, it can be all too easy to fall into the trap of eating stodgy, comfort foods. But poor food choices can lead to low energy and low mood. So what are the best warming dishes to eat this autumn?

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares some healthy and hearty meal and ingredient ideas to warm you up this autumn.

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WARMING SALADS

We tend to think of salads as having to be cold, but there are an abundance of salad recipes that are served warm.  For example, a roasted vegetable salad is both colourful and nutritious.  Why not roast some sweet potato (in season right now) with some red pepper and beetroot?  They can be served warm with some tossed mixed leaves and balsamic vinegar.

Additionally, chicken livers are great in salads, plus they’re really cost effective and are an excellent source of protein.  Even better, liver is high in iron – a mineral that is frequently deficient in the daily diet and is essential for energy and healthy red blood cell production.  Chicken livers work really well lightly sautéed in butter and thyme, served warm on a bed of salad leaves topped with artichoke hearts.

WARMING HERBS

Certain herbs and spices naturally bring blood to the surface making us feel warm even if they’re used in cold dishes; they can act like an internal radiator!  Warming herbs also aid digestion and balance blood sugar.

One great example is cinnamon; it can be used in so many different ways: it is perfect sprinkled on porridge in the mornings which will sustain energy levels throughout the day without leaving you feeling bloated.  In fact, cinnamon is great sprinkled on any dish where you might be otherwise tempted to reach for sugar.  Think natural yoghurt, stewed fruit, pancakes or cereals – the choice is endless.

Ginger is another warming herb which can be used in so many dishes, particularly stir fries or Thai-style fish.  However, for an excellent morning perk-up, ginger can be used in a warming tea, freshly grated with half a lemon; not only will your body feel warm even when it’s cold outside, this tea will help flush your liver through so your skin will glow!

Cardamom is another favourite which also helps to stop indigestion and can be used in the treatment of coughs and colds.  Why not start your day with some fruit topped with natural yoghurt?  Cardamom pods can be simmered gently in water and vanilla extract for around five minutes and then poured over some dried fruits such as pears, prunes and apricots.  For a great breakfast, sprinkle some sugar-free muesli over the top and you’ll be warm and energised all day long!

WARMING MEALS

Forget the stodgy, creamy pastas; think warming lunch-time soups, wraps or hearty chillies.  You can make some great soups at the beginning of the week using butternut squash, lentils and other root vegetables of your choice and refrigerate it in batches for the rest of the week.

Many of us tend to stock up on bread during the colder months which can lead to bloating and low energy.  However, why not make up some wholemeal wraps instead?  Wraps are great for lunch filled with avocado and tuna; this is a high protein lunch which will help avoid any afternoon slump.  Alternatively, wraps can be filled with sizzling beef and salad and topped with guacamole for a warming Mexican-style dish.

Chillies will not only warm the body, but also protect against colds and flu as we get into the season of bugs!  They can be used in traditional chilli con carne as well as curries.  An excellent seasonal curry can be made with spinach, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and chickpeas alongside chilli and curry spices of your choice.

So jump into autumn and breeze through the days without noticing the cooling temperatures by creating some of these warming dishes!

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Boost your protein at every meal with these great food ideas

Every cell in the body needs protein; it’s required for growth and repair, enzyme and hormone production and plays a key role in creating antibodies which fight off infection as part of the immune system.  Generally, around 15-20% of our calorie intake should come from protein.  So what should we be eating?

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her tips for including protein at every meal time!

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POWER BREAKFAST

In many ways, breakfast is actually the most important meal of the day.  It is a key opportunity for the body to be refuelled with essential nutrients.  Eating breakfast is vital because blood sugar levels are low after a night’s sleep and the body needs feeding in order to provide sustained energy for the day.

Top of the list for best breakfast choice would be eggs; they’re a complete protein source, meaning they contain all the essential amino acids the body needs and which it cannot make. The main reason we need protein in our diet is to supply the eight essential amino acids and eggs provide these.

If eggs are not for you, how about a designer muesli instead?  If you mix up some oats, barley flakes, rye flakes, wheat germ, seeds and add some chopped apricots and raisins, you’ve got a tasty and nutritious breakfast.  All these grains all contain protein.  This muesli can be mixed up and stored for a while; a portion can also be soaked overnight in milk or apple juice, making it easier to digest in the morning.  Even better, all the grains are slow energy-releasing, which means they’ll keep you going through the day plus they’re also packed with energising B vitamins.

VITALITY LUNCH

Lunch often has to be prepared quickly or transported to the office or place of work.  But this shouldn’t stop you from including a choice of protein and colourful foods.

Chicken noodle salad is a good example of something that can be made in advance with cooked chicken breast or left-over chicken, rice noodles, baby corn, sliced carrot, soy sauce, garlic and shredded cabbage or spinach leaves.  However, if you’re vegetarian you can swap the chicken for tofu or prawns and you’ve got a really quick, nourishing salad.  The protein (chicken, prawns or tofu) can either be eaten hot or cold.

Another high protein and energising carbohydrate lunch can be found in a spicy bean salad. Beans are low on the glycaemic index but also contain good amounts of protein.  Tinned mixed beans can be combined with tomato, cooked French beans, coriander and Tabasco sauce along with your favourite dressing.  Easy, quick, delicious and sustaining!

DINNER DELIGHTS

Protein is found in so many different foods, which means there’s a wealth of dishes on offer for dinner.  Animal protein includes red meat, chicken, turkey, fish, dairy products, and eggs.  Animal proteins generally contain all the amino acids whereas plant-based proteins don’t.  However, by carefully combining grains with beans, for example, you can get all the essential acids you need.

Quinoa, which has a very similar texture to couscous, has a really good amino acid profile, making it a great protein source whether you’re vegetarian or not. Quinoa works really well as an easy dinner dish with roasted vegetables.

If you’ve had eggs for breakfast, chicken for lunch, then how about some protein-packed fish for dinner?  Oily fish such as trout is absolutely delicious and is also packed with omega-3 fats which are great for the brain, skin and heart.  Any oily fish can be really simply cooked in a baking dish, drizzled with lemon and olive oil and served with some lightly toasted pine nuts and steamed vegetables.

Another excellent source of protein are lentils.  They’re also packed with fibre to keep the bowels super-healthy.  Lentils work really well with spinach; whilst you’re cooking some brown lentils, chop some coriander, cumin and garlic.  These can be briefly stir-fried before adding to the pan with some spinach.  All the flavours combine really well together and you’ll be getting some energising iron from the spinach as well as some heart-loving garlic.

With so many protein options available, your body can be properly fuelled and nourished all day long.

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Celebrate ‘Best of British’ with these home-grown, nutrient-boosting foods

Once again, it’s British Food Fortnight which is the biggest annual, national celebration of British food and drink.  And there’s much to celebrate!  It’s  a chance for us to fully embrace great British foods on offer and those particularly in season right now. And eating seasonally means we are getting foods at their most nutritious.

With that in mind, Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five favourite British foods for autumn.

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DOVER SOLE

Although cod is still the most consumed fish in Britain Dover sole is many people’s favourite flat fish! Dover sole has a longer and narrower shaped body than other flat fish and delivers a wonderful, almost sweet taste, with flaky texture when cooked. And it’s good to know that British fish is always responsibly and sustainably sourced.

Aside from its delicious taste, Dover sole is super-healthy with only around 100 calories per 100 grams and very low in fat.  It’s also high in protein.  However, it’s all about the cooking because frying can really increase the calorie and fat content due to the high surface area of the fish. Dover sole is much better lightly seasoned with flour and then grilled.

APPLES

Think of autumn fruit and thoughts will always turn to apples. Whilst we see apples in the supermarkets all year round, British apples are now in season.  This means they should be cheaper and we’re also giving our bodies exactly what they need at the right time of year by eating seasonally. The flavour, texture and scent of in-season apples will also be enhanced.

Interestingly, imported apples are often stored for months in a cool environment where the oxygen balance has been chemically lowered.  This halts the natural maturing processes, so they can be kept for several months without going soft.  However, when the fruit is then exposed to normal temperatures, in the supermarket, it will mature quickly and go soft.  The longer storage times will lead to depleted nutrient levels in the fruit, especially vitamin C, so this is another great reason to eat in season!

Apples are so versatile in many recipes and make a perfect high fibre, on-the-go snack.  But with British pork also in season, roast pork with apple sauce would be an excellent menu choice.

POTATOES

Potatoes are a great staple family food; filling, high in vitamin C and fibre.  And they’re definitely best eaten in season and fresh, not only for the taste, but also for retaining vitamin C (which starts depleting as soon as potatoes are harvested).  Once bought, potatoes prefer to be taken out of their plastic packaging and not stored in the fridge.  They’re also best stored in a cool cupboard as they don’t like too much light.

Many people resist eating potatoes, worrying they are fattening.  But it’s often the lashings of butter, the frying, or the cream in a potato dauphinoise that adds the calories!  Whilst jacket potatoes have a high carbohydrate content, if they’re eaten with some protein such as tuna, for example, the meal has much less effect on blood sugar levels.  And as a potato’s best source of nutrients and fibre is found in the skin, it’s a win-win!

CHICKEN

Another staple in the British diet, chicken is certainly at its best during food fortnight and moving into the autumn season.  British chickens are very safe and are generally vaccinated against salmonella, a bacteria that can cause nasty food poisoning.  We’re actually very proud of our quality chickens and they must meet criteria based on the Assured Chicken Production standards; these products have a distinctive red tractor logo.

Recipe ways with chicken are endless and with its high protein content (more than fish) and being a low fat meat, it’s always going to be a popular choice for many of us.  Chicken also contains the whole family of B vitamins which provide us with energy.

In terms of taste, chicken works equally well with sharp flavours (think lemon chicken), spicy dishes (fragrant, Thai curries) or sweet recipes (such as sweet and sour chicken).

Chicken broth is also a firm favourite during convalescence, particularly after a viral infection such as the flu.  Chicken broth naturally works as a decongestant and is especially effective and nutritious when stock from boiled chicken bones are used.  It’s easy to digest, and is a great source of protein and energising vitamins.

PEARS

Another great British grown fruit, pears are totally delicious at this time of year.  Pears are one of the least allergenic foods and are well tolerated by nearly everyone.  They’re also very appropriate as a weaning food and in exclusion diets.  Moreover (just like apples), pears provide good levels of vitamin C, fibre from pectin and heart-loving potassium.

Pears are perfect in sweet or savoury dishes: try them with a blue or goat’s cheese salad, with chocolate in a pudding, in a crumble with blackberries or with duck breast pan-fried.

Whichever foods you choose, British foods in season are always going to be high quality and you’ll be supporting local and national businesses to ensure continuing high standards whilst getting the best levels of nutrition.

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Switch up your nutrition this autumn with some seasonal food favourites

As the new season arrives, a change in temperature also signals a change in what to eat.  It makes great health sense to eat with the seasons, as nature intended.  However, some of our traditional summer foods can still be eaten, in slightly different ways, as some seasonal ones are introduced.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer gives some top tips on what we should be eating this autumn!

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As the days get a little colder and darker we may naturally reach for traditionally filling foods such as macaroni cheese or other heavy pasta dishes. Unfortunately these are notoriously difficult for the digestive system to cope with and can leave you feeling bloated and lacking in energy.

Instead, choose foods that are packed with nutrients and loaded with antioxidants.  Prevention is always better than cure and if you can keep your immune system in good shape now, hopefully you’ll dodge the autumn/winter bugs!

BERRIES

We tend to think of berries as being summer fruits.  However, they’re always available and whilst we may eat them just as they are or with a little crème fraiche in the summer, they’re also great in warming recipes.  Think warm blackberry coulis, apple and blackberry crumble, braised red cabbage with blackberries or raspberry muffins.

Whilst some of the vitamin C will be lost during cooking, these dark berry fruits are packed full of anthocyanins – powerful plant compounds that provide protective antioxidants to support the immune system as the nasty bug season starts!

HERBS AND SPICES

As the weather becomes a little chilly, the body craves more warming foods. Warming herbs and spices that are perfect for this time of year include black pepper, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, garlic, ginger and horseradish.

All are really easy to include in everyday dishes. Porridge is a great warming breakfast and works perfectly topped with some cinnamon.  Not only will your body be warmed and ready for the day, the oats will keep you feeling fuller for longer and this effect is also enhanced due to the blood sugar balancing effect of the cinnamon.

Ginger is also versatile in many recipes, particularly stir fries and Thai dishes, and is just as effective used in a tea.  It has thermogenic properties which can keep you warm and also speeds up the metabolism so you’ll burn more calories even whilst sitting at your desk!

And of course the traditional Sunday roast is perfect right now; roast beef with hot horseradish sauce is definitely an autumn favourite!

WINTER VEG

Many delicious vegetables come into season as we move into the autumn months.  Pumpkins, of course, are very seasonal with the approach of Halloween.  But don’t just use them as lanterns; pumpkins are packed with nutritional wonders!  They contain high levels of beta-carotene which the body turns into vitamin A, which is essential for the immune system and also for night vision (perfect for the darker evenings!)   Curried pumpkin soup is a real winner.  You’ve got all the nutritional benefits of pumpkin but you can also include many warming spices such as ginger, chilli, cayenne and cumin.

Swede is great as a vegetable side dish mashed with black pepper or can equally be used in stews. Celeriac often gets forgotten about but makes a great vegetable side dish, and courgettes add colour and taste to any plate.

Why not roast a large tray of root vegetables for a warming supper dish; carrots, beetroot, artichokes, onions and parsnips all work well together and complement roasted cod with garlic perfectly!

So enjoy experimenting with more warming foods this autumn and embrace the seasonal produce!

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Guilt-free and nutritious food rewards to make you smile!

When we’re having a tiring or stressful morning, day or week, little treats can make us feel better – or can they?  What you reach for could either make you feel virtuous or leave you feeling guilty. So how can you treat yourself and still feel good?

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares some great food tips on how to reward yourself guilt-free!

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BREAKFAST

Maybe the kids have kept you awake all night.  Maybe you’re feeling exhausted after a busy week. Whatever the reason, our bodies naturally crave sweet treats when we’re tired. But if your breakfast is laden with sugar, your energy levels are going to crash later in the day.

So how can you treat yourself at breakfast? Why not whip up some pancakes which can be filled with low glycaemic, energy-sustaining fruit such as blueberries or strawberries.  The eggs in the pancakes are also going to keep your blood sugar levels stable, which will help to lift your mood.

Even better, try making the pancakes with whole wheat rather than white flour to get more energising B vitamins.  If you still feel the need for some added sweetness then maple syrup has a much lower sugar content than jam and therefore less calories.

MID-MORNING CRAVINGS

Your boss is driving you mad and you’ve still got another couple of meetings to go. Instead of running to the vending machine and grabbing a chocolate bar and a cappuccino, why not head across to the coffee shop and grab an Americano at only 11 calories and treat yourself to an almond biscotti!

With around 150 calories they’re much better than a chocolate bar or muffin which average around 450 calories.  It should get you through the rest of the morning, just try not to rely on it every day!

LUNCH-TIME PLEASURES

Often you’ll be grabbing lunch on the run during your lunch hour or on the way to work.  Sushi is a really popular ‘go-to’ choice which is often viewed as being very healthy.  However it really depends on what you choose: certain types of sushi, for example California rolls, are fairly high in calories at around 140 per roll, and sushi rice is made with sugar and rice vinegar.

However, if you choose sashimi with some miso soup, for example, then you can still indulge your passion without worrying about too many added calories.

AFTERNOON DELIGHTS

You’re sat at your desk, you’re hungry and dinner time is a long way away.  Or perhaps you’ve just got home after a day out with the kids.  You need a pick-me up snack.  Crudités and dips are very transportable, particularly if there’s a fridge in the office, but you need to watch which dip you pick.  Taramasalata is delicious but contains around 90% saturated fat.

The healthiest dip to choose is tzatziki which contains only around 15 calories per tablespoon. Or you could go for hummus or guacamole which is somewhere in between. With some chopped vegetables such as carrots, peppers and cucumber you’ll have a really healthy treat which will bridge the gap until dinner time.

If nuts are your ‘go-to’ afternoon snack try swapping your cashews for almonds and you’ll be gaining some really healthy, brain-boosting omega 3 fats and lots more fibre.

DINNER-TIME TREATS

Pasta is always popular on the dinner menu, particularly for children but also as a quick and filling base meal.  However, pasta with a cheese-based sauce is heavy on saturated fat.  For a much healthier option go for whole wheat pasta, which has not been refined and is high in energising B vitamins, and use a tomato-based sauce instead.

If you’re thinking about a spaghetti bolognese, then using low fat mince is also going to reduce your fat intake. However, if you swap the spaghetti for some Japanese Udon noodles made from whole wheat, you’ll be reducing your overall calorie intake and also gaining even more fibre on your plate.

If you’re looking for a sweet treat for dessert, then think Banana Split!  It doesn’t need to be the calorie and fat-laden restaurant version.  Instead, whisk some low fat Greek yoghurt with a little vanilla essence or a sprinkle of cinnamon.  Slice the banana and top with the yoghurt, some berries of your choice, pistachios and a teaspoon of chocolate sauce (or maple syrup or honey would be even better!) You’ll have a deliciously indulgent dessert but with more nutrients and less fat and sugar.

So with these reward foods, you can still treat yourself and eat a little bit healthier at the same time!

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Supercharge your health with fermented foods

Fermented foods are certainly in vogue right now. Unlike many other food fads, fermented foods are actually the real deal.  And now they’re becoming part of many people’s diets and featuring on trendy restaurant menus.  However, many people are unsure just what they are, how to eat them and what health benefits they provide.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer provides her ‘go-to’ guide to fermented foods.

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WHAT IS FERMENTATION? THE BASICS

The process of fermenting food has been around for many thousands of years. Fermented food is the mainstay of Japanese cuisine and is thought to be one of the reasons for their well-balanced hormone health.

To better understand the benefits of fermented food we need to look at how our gastrointestinal systems work. The digestive system is packed with billions of bacteria (mainly good) that are incredibly beneficial to health.  They help to keep the digestive system running in smooth working order, boost the immune system, detoxify the body, help manage the body’s natural inflammatory response, balance hormones and protect the body from serious degenerative diseases.

The process of fermentation encourages the production of these beneficial bacteria; it allows the natural sugars and salts within the foods, (together with the added salts that are part of most fermentation processes), to create the good bacteria. Put simply, the more fermented foods we consume, the more beneficial bacteria we have!   Live natural yoghurt is one great example of a fermented food. Fermentation also helps to preserve foods over a longer period of time.

TOP THREE FERMENTED FOODS

There are many fermented food options available but to get you started, here are three of my favourites.

KEFIR

Bang on trend right now is kefir.  It’s a fermented milk product made from either sheep’s, cow’s or goat’s milk.  It provides wonderful benefits for the digestive system, particularly helping to ease bloating and symptoms of IBS.  It’s also great for the immune system because it contains a high percentage of probiotics or beneficial bacteria.  Plus, kefir is high in some of the B vitamins to provide great energy as well as vitamin K2 which supports the bones and heart.

It’s naturally quite sour so is best combined with fruits or yoghurt, or can be used in any recipe as an alternative to buttermilk.

You can even make your own fermented coconut kefir!  Use kefir grains mixed with some coconut milk in a jar.  Store in a warm place, covered with a cloth for 24 hours and the mixture will naturally ferment to produce a more palatable and healthy milk.  It can then be used on cereal or in pancakes for a delicious, healthy start to the day!

SAUERKRAUT

Probably one of the most popular fermented foods, sauerkraut has been eaten for hundreds of years throughout Central Europe.  It’s very simply made from chopped cabbage that’s fermented in salt.  However, as with fermented dairy products such as yoghurt and kefir, fermenting cabbage takes its nutritional benefits to another level!

Probiotic foods, including sauerkraut, deliver huge benefits to the digestive system. Additionally, more B vitamins are naturally produced as well as beneficial enzymes, which are used for many essential body processes.

It’s actually very easy to make at home; simply chop one head of white or red cabbage into small shreds. Add some salt and pack tightly into a jar with a tightly fitting lid.  This needs to be left for about a week in a warm place and you’ve then created your very own superfood!

MISO

Another very fashionable ingredient right now, miso is a traditional Japanese ingredient that is produced by fermenting soy, usually with salt, which makes a brown paste.

Miso is often used by women struggling with menopausal symptoms and people suffering from other hormonal complaints. Soy naturally contains phytoestrogens – plant foods that have an oestrogen-like activity and a hormone-balancing effect on the body. Phytoestrogens became of interest to scientists when they realised that women in certain traditional cultures in Japan that were eating a diet high in soy and other phytoestrogenic foods, had fewer menopausal symptoms than Western women.  It seems that these foods can really help combat the effects of the peri-menopause and the menopause.

One of the most common ways of eating miso is in a soup and there are a number available in supermarkets or health food stores.  Alternatively, to make your own, you simply need to mix some tofu, nori (a type of seaweed) and onions with water and miso.  That’s it! The main point to remember is to simmer miso as boiling it can reduce its health benefits.

So try adding some fermented foods to your diet this season and give your health an extra boost!

 

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