Holiday nutrition: delicious European dishes to try this summer

A beach restaurant overlooking the sea

With the holiday season in full flow, many of us will be looking forward to some delicious new dishes to try at our holiday destination. Eating local fayre is an important part of any holiday and it’s always good to try local or new tastes.

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There is plenty of delicious and nutritious food on offer around Europe – be brave with your food choices and you’ll be rewarded!

Clinical nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five favourite dishes from around Europe.

Menemen in Turkey

I always like to start the day right on holiday and this meal really does the trick! Although it’s not always seen on restaurant menus, it’s a quick breakfast dish that’s basically up-market scrambled eggs. For me, eggs are always the best breakfast because the protein keeps me going for longer so I’m not tempted to keep snacking through the morning.

Menemen Turkish egg breakfast dish

Even better, menemen is cooked with onions, peppers and oregano. This means I’m enjoying a great taste, some additional vitamin C from the peppers to keep my immune system strong and digestive support from the oregano. Oregano can help to keep nasty tummy bugs at bay – just what’s needed whilst on holiday.

Gazpacho in Spain

Whilst cold soup may not appeal to everyone, this traditional dish from southern Spain definitely needs to be tasted to be fully appreciated. It’s essentially a tomato soup with garlic, onions, red peppers, vegetable stock and plenty of olive oil. The key to having the best tasting gazpacho is to use vine-ripened tomatoes (even better if you’ve got home-grown ones).

Gazpacho

This dish is super-healthy as tomatoes are loaded with lycopene, a powerful antioxidant. Red peppers contain some of the highest amounts of vitamin C of all vegetables, and garlic and olive oil are both great for a healthy heart. Plus it can be made really quickly and stored in the fridge for a few days. Whilst you’ll certainly be wanting to be make your own on your return, traditional food always seems to taste even better when enjoyed on its home soil!

Moules in France

No visit to France would be complete without a bowl of moules mariniere (mussels) served with some fresh crusty bread, to soak up all the lovely juice. The traditional way of preparing French moules is with onion, garlic, chopped parsley, some white wine and a little double cream.

A dish of moules mariniere French Mussels

Whilst I absolutely love this dish, I also know just how nutrient dense it is. Interestingly, mussels have the most impressive nutrient profile of all shellfish, being a fantastic source of protein and low in fat. Plus they contain plenty of energising B vitamins, vitamin C and iron. Parsley is great for liver health, so you don’t need to feel too guilty about enjoying these with a small glass of white wine too.

Dolmades in Greece

I’ve often struggled in Greece with food that is overly heavy and fat-laden, particularly moussaka. Thankfully, there are actually plenty of other healthy and fresh dishes to be enjoyed around the mainland and islands. And if all else fails, then traditional Greek salad with feta cheese and vine-ripened tomatoes, olives, cucumber and onions never fails to delight!

Sufed vine leaves from Greece

However, a real Greek treat is dolmades which are grape or vine leaves stuffed with rice, pine nuts, mint, onions, dill and lemon juice. They are very time-consuming to make so I’m not sure I would ever try them at home, which is another reason to enjoy them, generally as part of a meze plate, whilst away.

The combination of the varied herbs makes for a great taste but they also help the digestion, which is often helpful whilst on holiday.

Tagliatelle marinara in Italy

Whilst I would generally steer away from eating pasta in the UK, mainly because it can taste pretty bland, in Italy pasta takes on a whole new meaning! In fact, every trip to Italy should feature trying an array of freshly made pasta dishes with range of delicious sauces.

A plate of tagliatelle marinara

One of my favourites is tagliatelle with a marinara sauce. This is basically a very tasty tomato-based sauce with onions, garlic and olive oil and it really makes the pasta come alive. Clearly, the Italians love their sauces, and as delicious as they are, the creamy-based ones are very high in fat and calories. So enjoy these in moderation and instead opt for something a little less calorific so you’ll be able to enjoy pasta on more days throughout your holiday.

So enjoy eating abroad this summer and try as many local dishes as possible to really tickle the taste buds and boost your nutrition at the same time.

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Top nutrients for a tip-top smile

Cloe up of woman smiling brightly with a becah background

A lovely smile brightens up the face and healthy teeth are key to having a smile that engages the world! Good teeth are often built in the early years from having sufficient nutrients, particularly calcium and vitamin D in the diet. But what other nutrients are important?

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares the five most important nutrients for a lovely smile.

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CALCIUM

It’s the most abundant mineral in both the bones and teeth, therefore it’s important to have sufficient in the diet. If you missed out during childhood, for whatever reason, it’s never too late to make sure your diet is calcium-rich. Whilst dairy foods are some of the richest sources of calcium many people are intolerant or have an allergy to dairy foods.

The good news is that there are many dairy alternative milks which are naturally rich in calcium or are fortified such as soya, coconut and almond. There are also a great variety of dairy-free yoghurts to enjoy. Green leafy vegetables, sesame seeds, fish with bones such as sardines and tinned salmon, beans and lentils are all rich sources. Kale contains some of the most absorbable calcium around! The best advice is to include a variety of foods containing calcium in your diet.

VITAMIN D

Known as the sunshine vitamin, Vitamin D actually goes hand in hand with calcium when it comes to healthy teeth and bones – in fact calcium needs vitamin D to do its job properly. Even though summer is on its way, with hopefully more sunshine, sunscreen and lack of time out in the sun means we’re often still vitamin D deficient. If you want healthy teeth, you should ideally be taking a vitamin D supplement all-year round containing at least 10 micrograms. And Public Health England supports this recommendation.

Interestingly, foods such as oily fish with bones that are high in calcium, also contain some vitamin D, so get that barbeque lit and cook up some sardines!

COQ10

CoQ10 is a vitamin-like substance that is naturally produced in the body but diminishes with age and is frequently deficient. In fact, CoQ10 is a very powerful antioxidant working hard throughout the body holding back age-related diseases. However, it’s also been found to be very effective at reducing gum disease through supplementation1.

CoQ10 is found in many foods including organ meats, beef and pork, oily fish, leafy greens such as spinach and cauliflower as well as oranges, although not in great amounts. It’s been found that as little as 50 mg of CoQ10 in supplement form, daily, can help reduce the severity of periodontal disease. It’s actually the gums that can be problematic as the years roll by, leading to pain, bleeding from the gums and loss of teeth, all detrimental to a healthy smile!

VITAMIN C

Vitamin C is key in the production of collagen. Since collagen is the most abundant protein in the body, it make sense that teeth will also contain some. Plus vitamin C is our key antioxidant helping to fight damaging free radicals that attack all parts of the body, and unfortunately, the gums are no exception.

Eating plenty of colourful fruits and vegetables, particularly strawberries (in season right now and delicious with some calcium-rich cream), cherries, sweet red peppers, kiwi fruits and leafy greens are also teeth and gum-friendly. Certain fruits, particularly citrus fruits are acidic and may attack tooth enamel. If you do eat them (and they’re particularly rich in vitamin C), rinse your mouth out with water afterwards and don’t brush your teeth for at least 30 minutes after eating to allow the enamel to settle.

MAGNESIUM

Magnificent magnesium is one of the other key minerals for healthy teeth and gums2. It’s as essential as calcium; magnesium helps to develop hard enamel that covers the teeth. Foods which contain magnesium include nuts and seeds but the good news is that it’s rich also in foods that are abundant in vitamin C, particularly green leafy vegetables. For a real ‘green’ hit, why not whizz up a green juice containing cucumber, pear, parsley, spinach and some mint for a really summery twist!

Magnesium is frequently deficient in the daily diet, partly because of our over-reliance on convenience foods and it’s depleted by stress. However, with some careful planning and also including wholegrains and nuts and seeds in your diet, you’ll have plenty to smile about!

So make sure to build a healthy smile this summer with these top teeth nutrients!

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Boost your energy from within with these top nutrients

The mind may be willing but the body’s saying NO! A common feeling! You want to get off the sofa or jump out of bed but every bone and muscle in your body is disagreeing with your mind. Sounds familiar? Unfortunately, many of us suffer with low energy levels much of the time (whatever age) and some of us feel tired all the time, also known as TATT. So what changes can you make to your nutrient intake to give your energy a boost?

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares the top nutrients we need to get that ‘leap out of bed’ feeling!

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IRON

The trace mineral iron is critical to human life. It plays a pivotal role in the production of red blood cells, transporting oxygen from the lungs around the body, but is also key in energy production. Unfortunately, it’s often depleted, particularly in teenage girls and women of child-bearing age, partly due to monthly menstruation but also down to the typical Western diet. Deficiency symptoms can lead to anaemia and tiredness.

The most well absorbed form of iron, known as heme iron, is found in animal foods particularly red meat, which many people don’t eat. However, non heme iron is found in plant foods such as nuts, Jersusalem artichokes and green leafy vegetables. Interestingly, even a small iron deficiency can cause fatigue and reduced physical performance, and this will be really noticeable if you’re a keen exerciser. It’s therefore worth getting a blood test from your doctor if you think you could be low in iron.

The good news is that even though plant-based foods do not contain heme iron, absorption can be considerably improved if they’re eaten with other foods containing vitamin C. Green leafy vegetables naturally contain a lot of vitamin C but drinking a small glass of orange juice at the same time can really make a difference.

MAGNESIUM

One of our most abundant minerals in the body, magnesium is essential for energy production as well as muscle function. Indeed, it’s key in producing our main energy producing molecule, ATP – Adenosine triphosphate – an energy-carrying molecule found in the cells of all living things. However, as with many other nutrients, magnesium is often deficient due to low intake from the diet, plus magnesium and the B vitamins are also depleted by stress, our modern-day epidemic.

Magnesium is found in whole foods such as whole wheat cereals and bread, beans and pulses, as well as green leafy vegetables, avocados, bananas and sweet potato. It’s also good news for seafood lovers as a portion of halibut supplies around a third of the body’s daily needs.

Magnesium can be a confusing mineral. Whilst it’s essential for energy production because of its role in enzyme production, it can also help people to sleep: this is because it aids muscle relaxation and as such is known as ‘nature’s natural tranquiliser’. So the best advice is to ensure you’re eating plenty of magnesium-rich foods throughout the day but if you need help sleeping then it’s best to take a supplement of magnesium around an hour before bedtime. Plus, the more sleep you have, the more energised you’ll feel!

B VITAMINS

These are a family of 8 nutrients that all work together in perfect harmony. Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, Folic acid and biotin all play key roles in energy production. They’re sometimes found in combination together in foods but they certainly all club together and work in unison in the body.

So where can you find them? If you’re having a varied and colourful diet, you’ll certainly be getting some B vitamins. However, vitamin B12 is only found in animal produce such as liver, fish, red meat and cheese. Therefore, if you’re vegetarian or vegan, you’re more than likely to need a supportive supplement. A lack of vitamin B12 will definitely cause energy levels to be low.

Biotin is often referred to as the beauty vitamin as it supports your hair and skin, but its presence is also essential for energy production. Another reason to be stocking up on nuts, rice, whole wheat cereals, liver and soya beans. And if none of these foods float your boat, then taking a supplement is a really good idea.

So fuel up with these top nutrients and energise yourself for a life with more get-up-and-go!

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The amazing benefits of Vitamin C

Many mammals produce their own vitamin C, but humans lost that ability many years ago, through lacking a specific enzyme within the body. Fortunately, as always, nature has come to the rescue since vitamin C is readily available in many foods, particularly fruits and vegetables. However, it’s quickly lost during food preparation, cooking and storage which is why it needs to be eaten very regularly.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer tells us everything we need to know about Vitamin C.

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WHAT IS IT?

Vitamin C is probably one of the most well-known vitamins. Whilst James Lind recognised during the 1700’s that lemons and limes could prevent the deficiency disease of scurvy, no-one realised it was actually down to a lack of vitamin C. It was first discovered by a Hungarian Biochemist, Albert Szent-Gyorgyi in 1928 and further work was then carried out to fully understand its chemical structure and its wonderful health benefits to the body.

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is water-soluble. This means it is not stored in the body, unlike vitamins A, D, E and K, and so needs to be consumed every day. Researchers and experts may differ in their views of how much vitamin C we need to consume daily, but one thing’s for sure: it plays an essential role in our daily nutrition.

WHAT DOES IT DO?

One of the most important functions of Vitamin C is the formation and maintenance of collagen which is essential for growth, skin health and repair of bones, tendons and cartilage. This is the reason why vitamin C is often known as the ‘beauty vitamin’ and why it’s found in skin preparations. Eating sufficient vitamin C will certainly help keep the skin looking young.

Additionally, vitamin C is our primary water-soluble key antioxidant and our first line of antioxidant protection. It works alongside vitamin E, our key fat-soluble vitamin, and the two complement each other at cellular level.

Vitamin C also plays a critical role in immune function by enhancing white blood cell production and providing antiviral properties.

WHERE IS IT FOUND?

Vitamin C is rich in most fruits and vegetables. However, it’s especially high in kiwi, papaya, citrus fruits, strawberries and sweet peppers. In fact, the easiest way to ensure you’re getting plenty into your diet is by looking at the colour on your plate. Have you eaten a fruit and vegetable rainbow?

It is quite difficult to eat all the colours of the rainbow in one meal but it’s certainly possible over the course of a day. Fruits and vegetables with their rich and vibrant colours are packed with vitamin C, as well as other antioxidants and beneficial nutrients, so include as many as you can every day.

HOW TO EAT MORE

Whilst vitamin C is lost during cooking, it does leech into the water if you’re boiling or steaming. So using the ‘vegetable water’ to make a sauce or gravy, or refrigerate it to use in a juice or smoothie at a later date. Alternatively, eating fruits and vegetables raw is a great way of retaining all their wonderful nutrient content.

An easy way to boost your vitamin C intake during the day is to snack on fruits and vegetables; for example, eat crudités with hummus or blueberries as a morning snack or try a few slices of apple before bedtime (which can also help with sleep). Take a leaf out of the Mediterranean diet: they may not eat lots of vegetables at meal times, but they eat them at other times of the day or often as a starter to a meal.

It’s good to get into the habit of having vegetables with every meal, whatever you’re eating. For example, you may have prepared a delicious chilli con carne with rice, but what’s wrong with having a side of broccoli with it?

NEED TO KNOW

Around 70-90% of vitamin C is absorbed fairly rapidly and excreted through the urine after about 30 minutes. For this reason, the body can’t absorb large amounts of vitamin C in one dosage, when taken in supplement form, hence the often-heard advice to take it in divided dosages throughout the day.

It’s also worth remembering that freshly sliced cucumbers, if left standing, lose around 45% of their vitamin C content within the first three hours. So, with all fruits and vegetables, prepare, chop and eat as quickly as possible!

So with a little thought and planning, it’s not difficult to eat good levels of vitamin C every day and you’ll quickly notice the benefits to your health.

FOR MORE GREAT DIET AND LIFESTYLE ADVICE

 

Sign up to receive our blog and get a weekly dose of the latest nutrition and health advice direct to your inbox.

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Visit us at www.feelaliveuk.com for the latest offers and exclusive Alive! content.

Follow and Chat with Suzie on Twitter @nutritionsuzie

For everything you need to know about vitamins, minerals and herbs visit Herbfacts