How to stay healthy and fit through the crisis

WOman holding a weight in one hand and plate of fruit and veg in the other

With the likelihood of a prolonged period of social distancing and home working, our normal everyday routine will become very disrupted.  Whether you’ve got a little more time on your hands because you’re not travelling to work, or you’re having to work much longer hours because you’re a key worker, it’s most important to keep as fit and healthy as possible during these challenging times.

Finding new ways to keep fit or new dishes to try will help to boost your morale and wellbeing.

Clinical nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her top tips for lasting wellness.

Load up on fruits and veggies

It seems like the shelves have been stripped bare of dried goods, such as pasta and rice, but fruits and vegetables are hopefully still available, certainly in lots of areas.  Also, don’t forget the corner shops and local farmer’s shops which still seem to be well-stocked.

A range of fruits and vegetables

Protecting the immune system is the most important thing you can do right now and there’s a variety of ways you can really help yourself and your family.  Fruit and vegetables are some of the richest sources of immune-boosting vitamin C, a great anti-viral agent.  Whilst it’s not going to cure the virus, having strong immunity will put you in better to shape to fight it if you are unlucky enough to succumb.

If you’re used to having pasta-based meals, then why not try more vegetable-based ones?  Sweet potato curry or sweet potato vegetable pie (loaded with immune-boosting beta-carotene), roasted veggies with chicken, fish or tofu, cauliflower curry, fajitas with avocado and red peppers – it’s just about getting more creative with your choice of dishes.

Sweet potato shepherd's pie

If you’re one of the 72% of the population currently not eating the minimum five-a-day of fruits and vegetables, then use this time to eat as many as you can daily.  Frozen are just as good as fresh as they’ve generally been frozen quickly after harvest.  Make your meals as colourful as possible!

Take a vitamin D supplement

We are all advised by Public Health England to take a vitamin D supplement through the winter months.  Never has there been a more important time to be taking a vitamin D supplement; vitamin D is essential for the immune system. And even though some sunshine has appeared, it can never produce enough vitamin D on the skin to be fully effective.

Vitamin D and a sunshine symbol written in the sand

Better still, take a daily multivitamin which includes a minimum of 10 micrograms (ug) of vitamin D: a multivitamin will also help plug any other nutrient deficiencies and further protect the immune system. You can also get some vitamin D from foods; eggs, mushrooms and fish are good sources, plus certain fortified foods such as breakfast cereals.

Sleep and rest well

In these times of heightened anxiety, stress can have a detrimental effect on the immune system.  It’s therefore really important to make sure you’re getting sufficient rest and seven or eight hours sleep per night.  Lack of sleep suppresses T cells in the immune system, which are needed to fight viruses and infections.

Close up of a woman asleep in bed

Equally, trying to take some relaxation during the day, can help you to sleep better at night.  Try using a calming app, practising meditation, reading a book – whatever you find helpful.  Also try to keep to regular bedtimes.

Woman with legs crossed sitting on bed meditating

If you’re used to being a social butterfly, clearly everyone’s wings have been clipped for a while.  Use the time to cut down on caffeine and alcohol as both will stop the body from sleeping peacefully.  If you’re in the situation of being indoors much more, then take the opportunity to re-think your life and try to ditch those foods or activities that are not promoting good health.

Warm yourself from the inside

It’s crucially important to keep the body hydrated to protect vital organs and make your internal environment more difficult for viruses to enter.

Glass of water with lemon

Additionally, if you’re dehydrated, your brain is going to feel foggy, concentration will be poor and energy levels low.  The body really likes warm drinks (about blood temperature).  Start the day with some warm lemon water to flush through the liver.  You can also sip this with some immune-boosting ginger throughout the day.

A cup of camomile tea and camomile flowers next to it

There’s a myriad of herbal teas which also boost immunity; echinacea, peppermint, red bush, green, rosehip and turmeric. Have one on the go throughout the day.  Soups containing loads of vegetables are also great immune boosters; chicken broth is thought to help fight viruses.  If you can boil up the bones to make a chicken stock first, even better!

Get some exercise

This is more difficult now with formal exercising venues, as well as public parks, largely being closed.  However, even if it’s a stroll around the block, getting some fresh air (away from other people) is great for the immune system.  However excessive exercise actually depletes immunity, so for some perhaps an enforced ‘slow-down’ may be good. Don’t overdo it.

Close up on woman's trainers walking in forest

Get creative with some kind of exercise routine. Running up and down stairs, press-ups, core exercise, squats and lunges can all be carried out at home.  Yoga, Pilates and other stretching exercises only require a mat: there are plenty of free videos online to follow in order to keep motivated.

A woman practising yoga in her living room

Most importantly, try to stay positive.  This is a phase in time that will pass.  However, the more you can do to keep yourself healthy the better you’ll come out the other side.

Stay well.

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All images: Shutterstock

 

Start the year right: how to stay on track in 2020

Woman with arms in the air with sunrise background and the number 2020 to represent the new year

If you’re like so many people who make New Year’s resolutions, often at the stroke of midnight when recollection can be a little hazy, you’re certainly not alone!  However, why not make your resolutions for next year slightly in advance and start the new year in the right frame of mind?

You’re much more likely to stick to them and your diet and lifestyle habits will stay on track.

Here are Clinical nutritionist Suzie Sawyer’s five top tips for starting the year right.

Don’t over promise yourself

New Year’s resolutions need to be doable and sustainable.  For example, if you say you’re going to lose eight kilos by the end of January, this may be possible if you starve yourself (not advised), but then you’ll end up putting all the weight back on (and more) which will be very demotivating.

Close up on woman's feet on a pair of scales with a measuring tape

The key to sustained weight loss is slow and steady – around a kilo a week is good.  If you’ve been eating lots of sugary and calorie-laden snacks over the Christmas period, then simply cutting back on these and eating three well-balanced meals a day is going to make a huge difference.  Fad diets don’t work because they’re not sustainable. They lead to nutrient deficiencies and energy dips, plus being ravenously hungry sets you up for failure.

Plug your nutrient gaps

The body has amazing powers of adaptation.  Most of us push ourselves hard, fail to adequately replenish lost nutrients, but somehow the body keeps going.  However, at some point, the body will start to complain, and this can happen in many ways that can adversely affect our health.

A selection of fruit and vegetables covering all colours of the rainbow

People often comment they have felt so bad for so long they can’t remember what it’s like to feel good.  Much of this is down to nutrient depletion.  The body is a machine that needs to be properly fuelled with nutrient-rich food.  Resolve to make each meal count in 2020.  Look at the colour on your plate – the variety gives a good indication of nutrient levels.  Be wary of any processed foods; the closer a food is eaten to its natural state, the more nutrients you’ll be consuming.

Move more

If you’re already into a good exercise routine, then well done!  However, many people don’t reach even the minimal recommend levels of exercise (five times a week for at least 30 minutes).  Exercise is crucial for health; it supports the immune system and it’s great for the heart and circulation. Exercise also stimulates the production of feel-good endorphins and it helps with weight management and preventing type 2 diabetes.

Two hikers enjoying a walk

Importantly, don’t set yourself up to fail.  If you hate the gym, that’s never going to change so don’t resolve to start a gym programme.  Instead, plan an exercise programme you’ll enjoy, even if it’s simply taking more walks, or starting cycling.  There’s no limit to options for exercise.  Even working from a stand-up desk is better for you than sitting down all day.

Limit screen time

Our 24/7 lifestyles with a never-ending stream of emails, messages and social media activity is not great for emotional wellbeing, let alone stress.  If you’re ‘addicted’ to social media, then why not resolve to manage the time you’re engaged with it and set yourself limits. There’s lots of research to suggest that looking at social media too much can contribute to feelings of anxiety and low mood.

Woman in bed looking at her mobile phone

If your workload is high and emails are non-stop, then you need to put some time management in place.  If work colleagues are set on sending emails around the clock, resolve to be off-line for adequate periods.  There needs to be a break between work and non-work-related activities for the brain to have some downtime.

Be optimally hydrated

The simplest changes can sometimes make an enormous difference to how we look and feel.  None more so than ensuring the body is sufficiently hydrated.  We often forget to drink water during the winter months when it’s cold outside.  However, the body still needs at least six to eight glasses of water daily – more if you’re taking regular exercise. As an indicator, your urine should be clear during the day.

A close up of a woman holding a glass of water to represent staying hydrated

However, if plain water’s not your thing, then liven it up with some fresh lemon and crushed ginger.  Herbal and fruit teas also count towards your hydration targets, as do fruits and vegetables.

Caffeinated teas and coffee are not great at hydrating, partly because coffee tends to work as a diuretic and tea is high in tannins which can stop the absorption of essential minerals.  Resolve to ditch the stimulants as much as possible and hydrate optimally.  Your heath and skin will thank you for it.

If you start the year right, without too many wild expectations, you’re much more likely to be hitting your goals throughout the year – and at the end of the year too!

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Water and the importance of hydration

Close up of woman on beach with a glass of water to represent hydration

We can actually live longer without food than water, such is its importance to the body. The body is around 80% water, therefore it makes absolute sense that we need to keep it continually hydrated.

However, it’s not just about drinking litres of water; the body needs plenty of variety in how we hydrate ourselves.

Clinical nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares some interesting facts about hydration and how to keep your body topped up!

Why is water so important?

Whilst the body contains a very high percentage of water, this isn’t just plain H20; bodily fluid contains a complicated makeup of various solutes. However, when looking at normal daily needs, plain and preferably filtered water is one of the best ways of replenishing and maintaining the body’s fluid content. As a general rule, you should be looking to drink between 1 ½ to 2 litres of water daily.

Because so much of bodily fluid is made up of ‘water’, it makes sense that if we’re dehydrated, it’s going to affect all bodily functions. The brain can become foggy, energy levels will quickly drop, the skin can look dull and lifeless and constipation is often a problem. However, severe dehydration will lead to much more serious issues. Thankfully, this extreme would never happen in normal everyday life, although mild symptoms can quickly occur, especially during the summer months.

A close up of a woman holding a glass of water to represent staying hydrated

A great way of assessing your hydration levels is to look at the colour of your urine. Apart from the first ‘pee’ of the day, your urine should be almost clear! And, on that subject, if you’re worried that as soon as you start drinking more fluid, you’ll be constantly in the toilet, this may happen for the first couple of weeks or so, particularly if you’re generally de-hydrated. However, after that time, the body will adjust and you’ll not need to ‘go’ as frequently!

Which foods are good for rehydration?

As the body is not just pure water, it makes sense that it needs a variety of liquids and food to effectively maintain good hydration. Many foods, particularly fruits and vegetables, have a very high water content, hence they will help to keep you hydrated. Indeed, these foods also contain electrolytes, so they will help maintain and rehydrate the body really well.

CLose up of a hand holding a slice of watermelow with the words hello summer cut out of it

If you’re having a vegetable juice each day, this will also count towards your daily fluid quota. And, of course, if it’s really hot or you’re exercising hard, then having a juice as part of your overall nutritional programme will certainly be a good plan. Cucumbers, watermelon, papaya, celery, strawberries and butternut squash are all great to eat regularly, particularly during the summer, in order to keep the body optimally hydrated.

Woman pouring a glass of milk

Milk (often thought of as a food) is also another great way of rehydrating, and has been found to be very effective. Drinking a small glass daily is a great idea and will also increase your calcium intake.

Are some drinks better than others?

Water, juices and milk are some of the best fluids to drink. However, there are also some that are best in moderation. Caffeinated drinks can often act as diuretics, which means the body tends to lose more fluid. Additionally, black tea contains tannins which may deplete the body of certain minerals, generally the essential electrolytes. Therefore it’s best to not drink too many in one day; one or two caffeinated drinks daily should be the maximum

A range of fresh vegetable juices

Often when the sun comes out, we often reach for a glass of wine! Whilst this can be a great way of relaxing and socialising with friends and family, if you overdo it, the tell-tale headache the next morning is generally a sign of dehydration. It’s more important than ever to make sure you’re doing all the right things to stay hydrated if you’re drinking alcohol as well. Alternating with a glass of water in between each alcoholic drink is a good idea

But what if water doesn’t float your boat?

Some people really don’t like drinking plain water. The great news is that herbal and fruit teas are a great alternative. You can also try a small amount of fruit juice diluted with water. This is especially good if you’ve exercised hard as it rehydrates quickly.

Mint tea

Additionally, water flavoured with mint, sliced ginger and cucumber is delicious. In fact, any fruit can be added to water to produce a great-tasting drink that is really effective at rehydration.

So make sure you get enough water this summer and keep your body topped up for optimum health benefits.

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Enjoy your healthiest festival ever with these top nutrition tips!

Two women lying in a tent at a festival wearing wellington boots

Festival season is here! And whilst they’re not renowned for being the healthiest of experiences, there is much you can do both before and during the event to ensure you stay happy and healthy throughout.

SMALLER--4 Suzie Blog pic

Clinical nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five top tips for festival health!

 

 

Before you go

As the saying goes ‘prevention is better than cure’ and this is most certainly the case when it comes to festival health. The body is going to be severely challenged during a festival; low-nutrient food choices with the potential for an upset tummy, lack of sleep, too much sun (if you’re lucky!) and maybe a tad too much alcohol.

However, your digestive system is your best friend here because if you can keep that in good shape, everything else will be supported. First up is the friendly bacteria in your gut; when this is well balanced it will help prevent tummy troubles, support the immune system and help the body better metabolise alcohol or too much sugar generally. If possible, take a course of probiotics for a couple of weeks prior to the event; these are readily available in health food stores.

A word cloud around Probiotics

Additionally, eat loads of foods that help feed the good gut bacteria such as live natural yoghurt, onions, garlic and green leafy vegetables. Green tea is also fantastic for both the immune system and the digestive tract.

Your natural health survival kit

There’s a few natural health aids you can take with you which will help to keep troublesome symptoms at bay. For a start, keep taking the probiotics (one a day is fine) for the duration of the festival. Also be sure to pack the herb Milk Thistle which can be easily purchased in tablet form from health food stores. It’s one of the best herbs for supporting the liver and soothing nasty hangovers. It also helps the digestion, so may soothe a grumbling tummy whilst you’re away.

Milk thistle flower and herbal medicine tablets

Whilst you’ve not gone to the festival to sleep, you’ll feel a whole lot better and enjoy the event to the full if you’re able to get some shut-eye. The herb valerian specifically helps with sleep, so take it while you’re there. An eye-mask and earplugs might also be advisable!

Make great food choices

Clearly, there’s a lot of unhealthy food to tempt you at festivals but there are some great staples which can provide you with a good balance of healthy nutrients. Breakfast is THE most important meal when you’re at a festival to help keep blood sugar in balance and energy levels sustained. Plus, you’ll be less likely to be tempted by unhealthy snacks and food later if you’ve started the day right. Eggs are always the best choice.

Poached egg on brown toast

Some of the best festival food choices are veggie options, including falafels, tacos and bean salads which are all energy-dense. They’ll fill you up without causing bloating. Plus, there’s often a coconut van on site; coconuts are great for energy and will also banish hunger pangs.

Water is your best friend

There’s rarely a more important time than when you’re at a festival for keeping the body properly hydrated. Lack of water is going to leave you literally feeling ‘drained’. Worse still, severe dehydration, coupled with sun and alcohol can lead to health problems. However, this is easily avoided by drinking around ¼ litre water every couple of hours, and definitely try and hit the 1.5-2 litres per day (more so if the weather is hot). If you are drinking alcohol try and alternate with a large cup of water in between alcoholic drinks.

Close up of woman drinking a bottle of water in summer

It’s also an occasion where drinking slightly diluted fruit juice is good to do; the body rehydrates quicker with a very slightly sweetened liquid.

Sneak in some snacks

Whilst it’s not always easy to take your own food into a festival and each event will differ, it’s not normally too difficult to take snacks such as protein bars, nut and seed combinations, coconut pieces, dried fruit or energy bars.

A selection of nuts as a snack

Whilst many snack bars are fairly high in calories, because they’re generally a combination of protein and carbohydrate, they will certainly get over any energy dips and keep blood sugar levels in balance. It might not always be convenient to buy food and having some handy snacks will help you through. Equally, you’ll be getting some additional nutrients such as vitamin C and zinc, to support your immune system.

So enjoy your festivals this season and hopefully you will return home feeling relatively healthy!

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The top 3 nutrition tips for a healthier 2019

It’s great to kick start your New Year health with a few easy wins! The trick with New Years’ resolutions is to make them achievable and sustainable. There is little point in going ‘all-out’ in January, only to lose motivation totally, as February starts.

SMALLER--4 Suzie Blog pic

To help you on your journey, Clinical nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares three top changes you can make TODAY for long term health results!

 

 

Start the day right

This one is so simple but oh so effective! Start every day by drinking 500ml of warm water (it should be body temperature) with some sliced fresh lemon and crushed ginger. This should be done when you first get up, for the greatest benefit.

Whilst the liver has carried out its normal detoxification processes during the night, some additional gentle cleansing first thing will certainly add a spring to your step. Lemon water will help flush out the digestive tract and also encourage liver enzyme production. Plus it also helps to alkalise the system encouraging energy levels to soar and skin to glow.

Fresh lemons and lemon tea with root ginger on a wooden background

Ginger is a great winter spice that helps rev up the immune system. It also feeds the good gut bacteria aiding digestion, and warms up the body ready to start the day. At this time of year when bugs are rife, both lemon and ginger will help fight any nasty invaders that may cross your path.

Include protein at every meal

Protein is needed to maintain well-balanced blood sugar levels which, in turn, keeps energy levels sustained throughout the day.

Protein is also essential for tissue repair, hormone production, beautiful hair, skin and nails and enzyme function; it’s absolutely key for life. Many people believe they need to eat lots of carbohydrates such as pasta, rice and bread to feel full. However, it’s actually protein that fills you up and stops those cravings for unhealthy sweet treats. So increasing your protein is also going to benefit any weight loss plan (and who wouldn’t want help with that at this time of year!)

A range of foods containing protein

Eggs, fish, chicken, dairy, turkey and meat are all great sources of animal protein. Great vegetarian sources are soya, tofu, tempeh, beans, lentils, grains, peas, nuts and seeds. Clearly, there’s a great choice of high protein foods; you just need to include some at every meal time. You’ll feel more energised, fitter, stronger and happier really quickly just by sticking to this simple rule.

Have a daily juice

This is not intended to replace a meal, but having a juice mid-morning provides a great nutritional ‘top-up’ for the day.

Whilst the recommended daily amount of fruits and vegetables is a minimum of five daily, from a nutritional perspective we ideally need around ten or more, which of course is not easy to achieve within our busy lives. Currently, only around 25% of the population are achieving this recommend minimum level of 5 a day. Therefore, juicing is a really easy way of increasing fruit and veg intake.

A range of fresh vegetable juices

Ideally a juice should contain mainly vegetables with some additional low glycaemic (not too sugar-laden) fruits. A great recipe example would be carrot, apple, celery, parsley and red pepper. Carrots are loaded with immune-boosting beta-carotene, which is converted into Vitamin A. Apples and peppers contain lots of vitamin C. Celery is great for keeping blood pressure in check and alkalising the body, and any green food such as parsley is packed with chlorophyll, also known as the ‘food of life’.

It’s easy to see how many more nutrients you can obtain from having just one juice a day. And by including whole fruits and vegetables at meal times and as snacks, then you’ll still be getting the essential fibre and enzymes that are naturally found in these whole foods.

So put these three easy wins into practise this year to supercharge your health in 2019!

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Five essential well-being tips for a happy and healthy holiday

You’ve planned for that long-awaited holiday and now it’s time to pack those cases. However, if you want to have the happiest and healthiest of holidays, then there are a few extra things you can do to make sure this happens.

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her five top tips for a healthy holiday.

SMALLER--4 Suzie Blog pic

BEFORE YOU GO:

PREPARE YOUR TUMMY

Wherever you’re travelling to in the world, even if it’s not too far away, you’ll still be out of your normal eating routine, plus you may be visiting countries where people are generally more prone to tummy troubles.

Close up on woman's stomach with hands making a heart shape to show a healthy tummy

The best advice is to take a course of probiotics at least a couple of weeks before you leave. Readily available in health food stores, probiotics are the friendly bacteria that keep your digestive system running smoothly, but also protect it from unwanted infections and tummy bugs. Look for a probiotic supplement that contains the strains Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

It’s also good to eat plenty of natural yoghurt before you go on holiday, as well as during your stay. And don’t forget to pack the probiotics too, so even if you don’t have time to start a course before you go away, you can take them throughout your holiday.

PREPARE YOUR SKIN

We all want to have glowing skin, particularly whilst on holiday but certainly when we come back. For a couple of weeks before you go, use coconut oil as a moisturiser; it’s one of the best. Skin can become very dry on holiday and using coconut oil means your skin will be super-soft and really well moisturised. Keep up the regime when you return and hopefully you’ll not suffer from any post-holiday flakiness.

Prepare your skin from the inside too by eating foods rich in beta-carotene before you go. That means lots of orange and red fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, carrots, sweet potatoes and red and orange peppers. Beta-carotene is a powerful antioxidant which will help protect your skin against sun damage. You’ll still need to wear sun cream, but it can help prevent any unwanted burning. And of course include them as much as you can in your diet whilst you are away.

PACK SOME ALOE VERA

Aloe vera was said to be the ‘Elixir of life’ by Cleopatra. As with so many of these ancient remedies, they deliver a wealth of health benefits, and aloe vera is no exception. Its benefits for the digestive system are well-documented, and it’s also great for the skin.

You can readily buy aloe vera in gel form; it’s a holiday essential as it will soothe any sunburn or irritated skin and also calm other skin complaints that may flare up whilst you’re away. And don’t just save it for your holiday; keep it in your medicine cabinet all-year round! It can also help soothe tired and aching joints and muscles.

WHILE YOU’RE THERE:

USE YOUR TIME WISELY

When on holiday, hopefully you’ll have some free time to just be in your own head space. You can really use this time to great effect by either learning something new (TED talks are great for easy listening and learning) or maybe even practice meditation.

As with anything, meditation does take some time to properly learn and many people give up along the way because they struggle to clear the mind or can’t feel the benefits. However, it’s worth persevering because meditation can really help to relieve stress and anxiety, and many practisers report feelings of inner calm and peace. You need a place of peace and quiet to meditate so try to plan this for a short time every day during your holiday.

DRINK PLENTY OF WATER

It may sound an obvious one but of all the things you should do before and during your holiday making sure you’re properly hydrated is key. It’s easy to forget how dehydrating the combination of alcohol and sun can be.

A couple of weeks before you leave for your hols, really increase your liquid intake. Always start the day with some warm water with lemon and ginger which helps cleanse the liver and alkalise the body. You can carry on drinking this throughout the day or if you prefer iced water then add some refreshing and inner-cleansing cucumber. Try to drink eight glasses of water each day. The body needs to be hydrated at a cellular level to function well, so preparation is key.

Close up of woman on beach with a glass of water to represent hydration

Whilst you’re away, it’s important to drink as much water as you can but obviously be mindful of drinking tap water. It’s always best to drink bottled or boiled water wherever you are in the world; parasites can be present in the water in many European countries as well as far-flung ones.

So with these five key tips, you should have a wonderfully healthy holiday – enjoy!

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Eat your way to great hydration

Close up of woman on beach with a glass of water to represent hydration

You probably don’t need reminding that the heat is on right now! We all want to enjoy summer months to the full. However, the body needs to be properly hydrated for energy levels to be sustained and the brain to remain sharp. The body is around 70% water, so what’s the best way of keeping water levels right?

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her insights on hydration!

SMALLER--4 Suzie Blog pic

Clearly, we lose more fluids when the weather it hot and steamy because, not to put too finer point on it, we sweat more! Plus, exercising during the hot weather is going to require more fluids to be replaced.

The best advice is to try to avoid dehydration. You can tell if you are properly hydrated because your urine should be almost clear. Generally, we need a minimum of the equivalent of eight glasses of water daily, and up to two litres during the really hot weather.   However, there’s lots of water in fruits and vegetables and they also count towards your fluid intake, plus they’ll deliver lots more besides!

The body naturally contains electrolytes, including sodium, and they all help to regulate water balance in the body. Therefore, we know that for effective hydration, water and other essential nutrients are all needed.

Here are five foods that will keep you hydrated all summer long!

CUCUMBER

This is probably the most watery of all vegetables. It contains some great immune-boosting nutrients such as vitamin C, but also provides plenty of electrolytes, so if you’re slightly dehydrated in the heat, it will help to get everything quickly back in balance.

Close up of cucumber

One of the great things about cucumber is that it makes a great snack and is particularly good dipped into hummus. Plus it’s so refreshing; keep a chilled jug of water handy with some sliced cucumber, mint and ginger. It makes drinking water much more interesting!

CELERY

Whilst many people find the taste of celery a little strange and over-powering, it’s certainly worth persevering. It contains plenty of vitamins A, C and K plus some fibre. Celery is also a must for helping to alkalise the body; the body prefers to be slightly alkaline rather than acidic. Over-acidity can cause muscle and joint pain, which is certainly not something you want when you’re out and about enjoying the summer.

Chopped celery and celery stalks on a wooden chopping board

Just like cucumber, celery makes a great summer snack or can be added to a smoothie or juice. In fact, having a vegetable juice after you’ve been exercising or sweating a lot in the heat is one of the best ways of re-hydrating the body.

WATERMELON

An obvious and delicious choice for summer! Watermelon needs no accompaniments – it’s just great simply sliced. It’s also perfect added to a jug of chilled water in the fridge and it’ll encourage you to drink more water! Watermelon is just over 90% water and its rich colour means that it’s also a great source of sun-protecting antioxidants.

Watermelon segments on a wooden board

Plus, if you’re planning a steamy night, then watermelon is the fruit to eat! It contain citrulline which stimulates the amino acid arginine that encourages blood flow to the sexual organs!

BERRIES

Strawberries actually contain the highest water content of all berry fruits and summer is the perfect time to be enjoying them all at their very best. Blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, cherries and blackberries all make great fruit salads, smoothies, crumbles, pies or Eton mess. And because they’re so transportable, they make perfect post-exercise re-hydration snacks.

Blueberries and strawberries in a heart shape on a wooden board

All berries are packed with anthocyanins, which are plant compounds high in age-blocking antioxidants. So, you’ll skin will look fresh and plumped from being properly hydrated and nutrient-loaded.

SPINACH

Whilst it can be very frustrating when cooking with spinach, as it reduces down so dramatically, its high water content makes it an excellent summer vegetable. It’s best added to salads to enjoy all its nutrients, but most importantly, to keep the body super-hydrated.

A pile of spinach leaves

Additionally, spinach is high in lutein and zeaxanthin, both powerful carotenoids which are very protective of the eyes. Whilst you should always be diligent about wearing sun-glasses when the sun is strong, your eyes will be better protected from the blue light that’s emitted from electronic devices, particularly computers.

So, whilst you’re eating your way to optimal hydration, you’ll also be benefitting from a great nutrient boost at the same time.

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