Eating seasonally this May: discover what’s in season and their nutritional benefits

Summer,Salad,With,Potatoes,,Green,Beans,,Asparagus,,Peas,And,Radishes

 

Eating with the seasons is something we nutritionists talk about all the time!  However, whilst we know this to be the best time to eat foods, and as nature intended, we do get used to eating what we want all year-round. 

It’s easy to forget, or not even realise now what’s in season and when. So, here’s a helpful reminder from Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer as to what is in season right now.

 

 

Asparagus

Whilst this vegetable provides plenty of nutrients, asparagus is really worth eating when in season and grown in the UK.  For the rest of the year, it often has a woodier and string-like texture. This is also the reason that you tend to see asparagus on restaurant menus much more during May, but the season is short, so grab some quickly.

Grilled,Green,Asparagus,With,Parmesan,Cheese

Asparagus is especially rich in folate, which is important for many different functions throughout the body including red blood cell formation.  Folate is rich in most green vegetables and including as much of this nutrient in your diet as possible is the way to go!

Asparagus is also a mild diuretic meaning it’s great if you struggle with water retention, especially ladies with PMS.

Enjoy it’s taste, texture, and health benefits this May!

Radishes

Radishes are part of the super-healthy cruciferous vegetable family. They are rich in antioxidant minerals such as calcium and potassium which together help lower blood pressure and contribute to reducing risk of many diseases.

Fresh,Summer,Fennel,Salad,With,Pea,Shoots,And,Radishes.,Top

 

Radishes are often popular with dieters as a snack because they are low in calories and fat and have a really delicious peppery taste. They are also great with a plate of crudites and hummus or in an easy summer salad.  If you’ve not ventured to trying them yet, make this month the time!

Sea trout

If you can find some locally to you, you’ll be well rewarded with its taste, texture, and nutritional goodness. Generally, you’ll need to go to the fresh fishmonger’s outlet to find the wild sea trout.  It will be pinker in colour than the farmed variety, because wild trout and, indeed, salmon, naturally eat the algae, astaxanthin, which turns them pink, but also provides amazing antioxidants.

Trout fish fillet with salad

Trout is also rich in omega-3 fatty acids which are essential for overall health, especially the brain, heart, joints, eyes, hormones, and skin.  Sea trout is delicious barbecued or simply grilled with a little butter.

Spring onions

If you’re struggling with allergies right now, then eating some spring onions could really help.  Onions contain a flavonoid called quercetin which works as a natural antihistamine in the body. Onions also provide benefits to the heart, helping reduce cholesterol levels and keeping blood thin, reducing risk of blockages in the arteries.

Potato,Salad,With,Mayonnaise,And,Spring,Onion,,Selective,Focus

 

Enjoy them in a potato salad, in fish dishes or stir fries.  They’re the perfect ‘easy’ vegetable to rev up your health.

Watercress

Another peppery-tasting salad vegetable, this member of the cruciferous vegetable family is equally nutritious.  Watercress is a rich source of folate and is great for liver detoxification. It also helps to support kidney function, so you can really uprate the health benefits by adding this to salads and sandwich fillings.

Ricotta,Cheese,,Green,Peas,,Watercress,And,Dates,Salad

In addition, watercress is rich in immune-boosting beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E.  It’s definitely a summer vegetable to enjoy, so grab some whilst you can when it’s crisp, fresh, tasty, and nutritious.

Seasonal eating is always best when it comes to flavour and nutritional content.  Try to reward the body as much as possible by eating with the seasons this May and indeed throughout the year.

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Five foods to feed your brain

 

A range of vegetables to represent fibre in the diet

It’s no secret that I talk about vegetables a lot! In fact, I frequently talk about them in terms of their varied and beautiful colours providing the amazing array of nutrients the body needs to stay healthy.

They are actually some of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet, gifted to us from nature, packed with vitamins and minerals, plenty of antioxidants and many other beneficial plant compounds too.

There are so many to choose from but this National Vegetarian Week I have picked my top five:

Broccoli

Did you know that one cup of broccoli has as much vitamin C as an orange? Which is great but it’s not the main reason why I rate broccoli’s health benefits so highly. Broccoli is part of the healthy family of cruciferous vegetables which contain a sulphur compound called sulforaphane.  Essentially, sulforaphane helps the liver to detoxify, is great for supporting brain health and importantly, is known to help protect the body from degenerative diseases.

Broccoli florets on a plate

Broccoli is also rich in folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12.  These three nutrients work as a triad in many key biochemical reactions throughout the body, especially when it comes to the brain, hormone, and energy levels.  The list of positives goes on and on with broccoli; try to eat some at least two or three times a week.

Sweet potatoes

Available in both orange and purple varieties, the purple type has even more antioxidants than its orange counterpart.

shutterstock_222440302-purple-sweet-potato-sept16

If you are trying to lose weight but feel the need for some carbs, then sweet potatoes are a great option as they don’t have such an impact on blood sugar balance.  Even better, whatever their colour, sweet potatoes are rich in beta-carotene, which is an antioxidant, and is also turned into immune-boosting vitamin A in the body, as needed.

Sweet potato wedges are a real go-to veggie for me!

Brussels sprouts

I know they’re not enjoyed by everyone, but I genuinely love them!  If you’re not a fan of Brussels sprouts, have you tried them with some bacon bits which helps to reduce some of their slightly bitter taste?

Just like broccoli, being part of the cruciferous vegetable family, Brussels’ health benefits are far-reaching. They are high in vitamin K which is essential for the bones and heart, vitamin C and folate, and are especially rich in fibre. 

shutterstock_179527487 basket of sprouts Nov15

The daily recommended amount for fibre intake is around 30g; most people manage only about 8 grams, which can have an impact on your digestive system not working as efficiently as it could. Many of the plant compounds in Brussels sprouts also help manage pain and inflammation throughout the body which can be caused by many different health issues.  Go on, give them another try!

Onions

Onions are fairly easy to include in the daily diet because they add so much flavour to so many dishes.  They’re especially helpful at this time of year because onions are high in quercetin which helps reduce histamine levels.  Hay fever sufferers, take note!

Red,Onions,On,Rustic,Wood

Onions are also rich in flavonoids – powerful antioxidants which have so many beneficial effects on health and are especially protective against heart disease.

Don’t hold back with onions; add them to stir fries (spring onions have the same benefits), soups, curries, pasta dishes or with other roasted vegetables.

Carrots

Whilst carrots don’t quite contain all the pizazz of the cruciferous veggies, they’re certainly in my top five because they do have great health benefits and they’re so versatile too!  Interestingly, although carrots are often eaten raw, their beta-carotene content is better released when they’re cooked.

shutterstock_250834906 carrots July16

Whether you eat them raw or cooked, carrots still contain loads of fibre, heart-loving potassium, and immune-boosting vitamin C.  If your kids love raw carrots, you’ll still be providing them with some great nutrients.

I love all vegetables and try to eat as much variety as possible.  And always remember – colour = nutrients.  Enjoy!

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Five foods to feed your brain

A plate with a picture of a brain on to represent eating healthily to support a sharper brain

You may be surprised to learn that the brain requires more energy than any other organ of the body. Well, maybe that’s not such a surprise when you think that the brain is always on!

It’s not just energy-dense foods that it loves, but specific nutrients too.  You can often notice the difference in all aspects of brain function when you feed it correctly.

Clinical nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her five top foods to sharpen the mind.

 

Salmon

Salmon, and indeed all oily fish, including mackerel, sardines, trout, and pilchard, are rich in the essential omega-3 fatty acids.  The brain contains loads of these fats and therefore they need to be topped up regularly for optimal function.

Fillet of salmon with some steamed asparagus

Importantly, the body can’t make these fats, so they need to be eaten in the diet (or supplemented).  If fish is not for you then make sure you’re eating plenty of flaxseeds (they can be sprinkled into yoghurt, cereals or porridge) or go for other nuts and seeds. 

Eggs

Eggs are a great source of many nutrients, but specifically choline, which the brain uses to create a neurotransmitter that helps to regulate memory and mood (amongst other key functions).

Scrambled eggs on toast with mushrooms and tomatoes

Eggs are also a rich source of vitamin B6 and vitamin B12, also needed for many brain functions, but specifically to produce brain neurotransmitters.  Protein is key for a sharp and balanced brain, and eggs deliver on this front too.  Indeed, starting the day with an egg-based breakfast will tick all the boxes for your brain health.

Blueberries

These beautiful berries are loaded with antioxidants which help protect the brain from damaging free radicals and the aging process.  Blueberries are also loaded with vitamin C which helps support blood flow to the brain, which in turn is going to improve memory and general cognitive function.

shutterstock_270983405 porridge and blueberries Sept15

Blueberries are, of course, very easy to transport, so they make a great snack.  However, they are just as easy to throw over your morning oat-based breakfast or added to natural yoghurt, with some seeds, for a great breakfast option. The great news is that all berries love the brain, so with summer berry season approaching, you’ll have plenty of choice.

Dark chocolate

Dark chocolate is packed with polyphenols, plant compounds that protect the brain from free radical damage but also help memory and overall brain function.  And there’s loads of research to support this too. What’s more, dark chocolate contains plenty of magnesium which helps to reduce stress levels; high levels of cortisol (the body’s stress hormone) are known to adversely affect brain function.

Squares of dark chocolate

Go for dark chocolate (ideally 70% or more of cocoa).  Unfortunately, milk chocolate does not provide the same health benefits and will deliver lots of sugar.  A couple of squares of dark chocolate daily can satisfy any sweet cravings and keep your brain sharp too. 

Water

Dehydration will reduce brain function quicker than nutrient depletion. It’s the often-forgotten piece of the nutritional jigsaw puzzle.  Water is essential for maintaining attention and keeping focus, reducing headaches and memory loss, and improving overall cognitive function. Even just 2% dehydration takes a toll on brain function. Whilst it’s not easy to quantify what this means in terms of volume of liquid, the important point is that even a marginal deficiency will have big impact.

CLose up of a woman holdnig a glass of water

If you aim to drink 1.5 – 2 litres of water daily, and you might need more if you’re exercising heavily, then you’ll be amazed at how much sharper your brain function feels.  And energy levels will soar too!

So, feed your brain by adding some of these elements into your diet and you should start to notice a difference.

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Seasonal eating: what to eat in April and May

Fresh,Green,Asparagus,Pattern,,Top,View.,Isolated,Over,Green.,Food

Many of us like to know what’s on trend. Likewise, keeping up with what’s in season when it comes to food can have a great impact on our diet and health. 

Unlike other consumer goods, these foods come back into season year after year so that nature can provide the body with what it needs at the right time of year.

Clinical nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her five favourite in-season foods this Spring.

Asparagus

From a nutritional perspective asparagus is particularly rich in folate, the food-form of folic acid, which is great for energy and producing healthy red blood cells.  In fact, a 100g portion of asparagus produces around three-quarters of the body’s requirement for folate each day, so your energy levels will be supported.

Additionally, asparagus is rich in vitamin C and vitamin E which help support the immune system, together with beta-carotene, also great for immunity.  It’s high in vitamin K which is needed for blood clotting, strong bones, and a healthy heart.

Grilled asparagus wrapped in parma ham

Asparagus is delicious lightly steamed and served with some hollandaise sauce. Another really easy way with asparagus is lightly roasted with a drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper and garlic or tossed with some parmesan cheese.  And for real simplicity, just pop it onto the barbeque sprinkled with a little salt and pepper.

Even better, it’s on many restaurant menus right now, so enjoy it whilst you can!

Spinach

Spinach has a slightly bitter taste which can be off-putting for some people. However, it’ what you put with it that makes all the difference. Spinach is a nutritional powerhouse and can also be added to many dishes to increase nutrient content without being too overpowering.  A good example of this might be a lemon risotto with prosciutto, where other flavours are strong, and spinach doesn’t conflict.

Dish,With,Delicious,Spinach,Risotto,On,Wooden,BoardNutritionally, spinach is packed with immune-boosting beta-carotene and vitamin C (and we need to protect the immune system all year round), plus energising folate. It also contains iron and plenty of health-protective antioxidants.

Plaice

 

Whilst it’s a fairly humble white fish in terms of taste, plaice is still as popular as ever in the UK.  Hopefully you can find some that’s been caught in our waters at this time of year.

Sea,Bream,Fillet,With,Tomatoes,,Green,Olives,And,Capers

Plaice is tasty, moist, fleshy, and high in protein.  As with all white fish, it’s also low in fat and rich in the trace mineral iodine which is frequently lacking in the UK diets and is essential for thyroid function.

For a super-easy and nutrient-rich meal why not tray bake plaice with spinach, olives and tomatoes, for a real Mediterranean treat.

Jersey Royal potatoes

The people of Jersey certainly know a thing or two about growing the most delicious potatoes as they’ve been doing it for over 140 years! It’s all about the soil, climate and careful farming methods that make these potatoes so unique in terms of taste and texture.

Summer,Salad,With,Potatoes,,Green,Beans,,Asparagus,,Peas,And,Radishes

From a nutritional perspective, they are no different to any other potatoes being rich in vitamin C, the B vitamins and fibre.  Plus, the skin is generally eaten with Jersey Royals as it’s so soft, so the fibre content increases.

For the simplest of recipes, enjoy them with a fresh tuna steak salad with hard boiled eggs and, of course, some spinach leaves!

Spring onions

As with all onions, spring onions are packed with flavonoids – plant compounds that provide much nutritional goodness, including antioxidant support. They’re also high in vitamin C, B-vitamins, and fibre.

Pile,Of,Fresh,Spring,Onion,On,Wooden,Table

Spring onions can be added to many dishes to provide some additional flavour without overwhelming the recipe, as can often happen with larger onions.  For example, they’re great added to mash and cheese. Spring onions are also great in stir fries and work really well with ginger, garlic, chopped veggies, and any type of protein.

So, why not get into the habit of eating more seasonally and benefit from eating flavoursome food at it’s best when nature intended.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stay well.

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Seasonal Eating: what to eat this spring

Fresh,Ripe,Asparagus,With,Sunny,,Vivid,,Hard,Light,And,Shadows.

Spring is my favourite time of the year!  Everything feels fresh and new, the days are longer and brighter and there is a great sense of looking forward to summer and being outdoors more.

Importantly too, spring brings some great foods, and they are some of my favourites.

Let me share these delicious spring foods with you as well as the nutritional and health benefits they provide.

 

Strawberries

Whilst we tend to associate strawberries with the summer and Wimbledon, they actually start coming into season during springtime.  Not only do they taste delicious, especially if you buy them freshly picked from a farmer’s market, they have some amazing health benefits too.

Strawberry.,Pattern,Of,Strawberrys,On,Colored,Background.

The rich dark pigments of strawberries signal that this fruit is loaded with protective antioxidants. Whilst they offer a wide range of benefits, they’re especially good for heart health.  Additionally, they help regulate blood sugar balance so are great if you’re wanting to lose weight, and their polyphenol content helps prevent unwanted diseases.

I love them just as they are but they’re also great with a little natural yoghurt, making a perfect breakfast and start to the day.

Asparagus

For some reason, asparagus isn’t everyone’s favourite vegetable.  Perhaps it’s because I know the wonderful health benefits of asparagus that makes me love it more! It’s high in antioxidants, immune boosting vitamin C and vitamin E, plus vitamin K which is needed for healthy bones and blood.

Fresh,Green,Asparagus,Pattern,,Top,View.,Isolated,Over,Green.,Food

I often recommend including asparagus in your diet because of its prebiotic fibre, feeding all the good bacteria that works so hard in the gut to keep us healthy. However, I also love the taste of asparagus, but only when it’s in season, otherwise it can be tough and tasteless.

Asparagus is great barbecued with halloumi cheese, or simply steamed, drizzled with a little butter, and sprinkled with Parmesan cheese.

Celeriac

Whilst I adore celeriac, I don’t eat it often enough because it’s not that easy to prepare!  In fact, its often called ‘the ugly one’ because of its knobbly appearance.  However, if you’ve got a sharp enough peeler, preparing celeriac is not difficult. It can then be boiled and mashed or blended into soups or casseroles.  Whilst it’s closely related to celery, the taste of celeriac is much more palatable and nuttier.

Celeriac

Celeriac has an impressive nutrient profile, being low in fat, but high in immune-boosting vitamin C and vitamin B6, together with vitamin K and manganese for great bone health. What’s not to love!

Crab

Crab is, of course, a strong-flavoured fish but is very versatile, so can be used in many ways.  Freshly caught and prepared, it is a real treat, especially if you eat it in places traditionally known for their crab. Cromer crab is a certainly one of my favourites!

Crab,Meat,Fried,Basil,On,Orange,Color,Background

Whilst it’s fairly low in fat, crab does contain good amounts of the super-healthy omega-3 fats which are essential for the heart, joints, heart, eyes, hormones, and skin. Crab also contains plenty of vitamins, minerals, and protein so it will keep you feeling fuller for longer.

Spring Lamb

Whilst I don’t eat much red meat, lamb is certainly top of my list and the taste of spring lamb is especially delicious. As with all red meat, lamb is a great source of iron, so really helps my energy levels. Plus, it’s high in B-vitamins, again great for energy, but also immunity and is a fantastic source of protein.

Lamb

Eating sufficient protein throughout the day, from a range of sources, is essential to keep blood sugar levels in balance.  Protein becomes even more important as we get older to help keep bones strong and prevent muscle wastage.  Losing muscle mass doesn’t need to be a ‘given’ as we age if we take good care of protein intake.

Easter is synonymous with lamb and is certainly a popular choice in many homes as a traditional roast on Easter Sunday.  Cook with plenty of fresh rosemary which is loaded with protective antioxidants, and garlic which is great for digestion and the immune system too.

I really hope you’ll love these spring foods as much as I do!

Stay well.

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Five greens to fuel your body this spring

A,Woman,Is,Cutting,Spinach,On,A,Kitchen,Board.

Spring is finally with us which always brings a smile to our faces.  Coupled with the fact that spring also provides us with some amazingly healthy foods, everything just feels much more positive.

Top of the food list for spring are greens. They are super-healthy and with a little bit of flavour can be delicious too.  You won’t need to be ‘forced’ to eat your greens ever again!

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five favourite greens for spring.

 

Spinach

Spinach doesn’t always get the credit it deserves, partly because its taste can be slightly bland if not cooked correctly.  However, gently wilted in a frying pan, with a little butter and crushed garlic and your plate will come alive!

A bowl of fresh spinach leaves

Spinach is extremely nutritious.  And whilst it’s often talked about in the same breath as Popeye, spinach is actually as rich in bone-loving calcium as it is iron.  Additionally, spinach is a great source of immune-boosting vitamin A and vitamin C.

Kale

A member of the cabbage family, kale is also a great source of two key antioxidants – vitamin C and beta-carotene. And just like broccoli and Brussels sprouts, kale contains indoles which stimulate liver detoxification and can also help protect us from diseases.

shutterstock_192761054 bowl of kale Apr15

Kale can taste a little bitter so ideally needs to be balanced with strong flavours. Simply stir-frying with garlic, soy sauce and oyster sauce is all it needs to bring your plate to life!

Watercress

Another member of the cruciferous vegetable family, watercress is one of the healthiest of all salad vegetables. It’s rich in vitamins, minerals and other antioxidants and contains only 22 calories per 100 grams. Interestingly, in traditional medicine, watercress has long been used to treat kidney disorders and liver malfunctions.

shutterstock_601599119 watercress Apr17

 

The distinctive peppery flavour of watercress makes it a great addition to any salad, especially with stronger flavours such as salmon or ham.  For a really easy mid-week meal why not try a creamy pea, watercress and pasta recipe with some mascarpone cheese, tarragon, garlic, and lemon. Delicious!

Purple sprouting broccoli

Whilst it’s a mixture of green and purple, this amazing vegetable is still a spring green!  This type of broccoli is higher in nutrients than other varieties of broccoli and is especially good to eat when young and tender. The darker the colour of the florets of purple sprouting broccoli, the richer the amount of immune-boosting vitamin C and beta-carotene. Boiling broccoli, however, almost halves its amount of vitamin C, so lightly steaming or stir-frying is best.

shutterstock_420677122 purple broccoli Apr17

As with all cruciferous vegetables, broccoli contains indoles which help protect DNA from damage and therefore may offer protection from some of our degenerative diseases.

Purple sprouting broccoli will partner well with almost any recipe but is also great stir-fried with some chilli sauce and sesame oil, for a really quick, simple, and healthy vegetable side dish.

Spring greens

The stars of the show, spring greens are so called because they are the first cabbages of the year. They are different to collard greens, which come later in the year, and are a darker green.  Spring greens look more like cos lettuces and don’t have the tough heart of other cabbage varieties.

Stewed,Young,Cabbage,With,Dill,,A,Traditional,Polish,Spring,Dish.

Spring greens are also less bitter in taste and don’t need much else other than some light steaming and drizzling with melting butter.  However, they’re also great in soups and casseroles.  And from a nutritional perspective, they certainly don’t disappoint.  As with other members of the brassica family, they will support your immune system, build and maintain strong bones, and help protect your body against free radical damage, responsible for the ageing process.

You’ll certainly be springing into the next season with these nutritional greens – pack as many as you can into your diet this season.

Stay well.

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Show your body some love this Valentine’s Day with these nutrient-rich foods

Blueberries in a heart shape

Whether you’re celebrating Valentine’s Day or not, this is a great time to show your body some love by feeding it a wide range of nutrients.

Cold, dark days and lots of bugs flying around take their toll on mental wellbeing and the immune system at this time of year.  So, fuelling yourself with the right nutrients is a good way to support your health as much as possible.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her top five foods to try this February.

 

Acai berries

Beautiful acai berries are loaded with powerful antioxidants which have health benefits for the brain, heart, and immune system. Unusually for berries, they also provide some of the healthy omega-6 fatty acids – great for the skin – and oleic acid which is good for the heart.

Acai,Breakfast,Superfoods,Smoothies,Bowl,With,Chia,Seeds,,Bee,Pollen,Acai bowls are still on trend and frozen berries are perfect with toppings of granola, nuts and seeds or desiccated coconut (or anything else you fancy!)

 

Buckwheat

This food often confuses people as it’s not actually wheat! Just like quinoa, it’s actually a seed and is a great source of protein.  For those who struggle with digestive issues, especially when eating gluten and wheat, buckwheat is a great alternative and is easily incorporated into the daily diet.

Close up of buckwheat pancakes with raspberriesIts high protein content includes the amino acid tryptophan, which is needed to produce the happy hormone serotonin.  If you’re wanting your partner in a good mood for Valentine’s Day, then buckwheat could be a great choice!

Why not treat yourself (and your partner) to a delicious breakfast of buckwheat pancakes with a dollop of natural yoghurt and berries of your choice, for a powerful start to the day.

 

Beetroot

If winter has left you feeling out of sorts, then including beetroot into the daily diet on a regular basis could really kick-start your immune system.  Plus, beetroot is a great liver detoxifier.  It has often been used as a tonic after illness because it’s loaded with vitamins and minerals.  If raw beetroot juice isn’t for you, then try adding some carrot juice to make it slightly more palatable.

Beetroot and goats cheese saladBeetroot has a great flavour and makes a lovely accompaniment to goat’s cheese in a salad, in soups, roasted as a vegetable side and even cooked into chocolate brownies.  Maybe your Valentine’s Day treat can deliver some great health benefits too!

Broccoli

A member of the cruciferous vegetable family, broccoli delivers plenty of health benefits. It contains plant compounds called indoles which help protect DNA from damage, hence can help provide protection against disease.

Fresh,Broccoli,SoupBroccoli is also a great source of beta carotene which is turned into immune-boosting vitamin A in the body, plus energising folate, and vitamin C.  If you can’t always find fresh broccoli when you want it, then do keep some in the freezer.  The nutrient content of frozen vegetables is very good as they are generally frozen and packaged very soon after harvest. 

How about cooking up some delicious broccoli and stilton soup for Valentine’s Day or just include broccoli on your dinner plate frequently, in order to enjoy its fabulous health benefits.

Chia seeds

 

 

These tiny seeds are packed with nutritional goodness, are incredibly versatile and can be used in many recipes including smoothies.  One of their main claims to fame is that they are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids which are beneficial for the heart, skin, hormones, joints, and brain.

Acai,Berry,And,Chia,Seed,Pudding,With,Blueberries,And,BlackberriesHowever, they also fare really well on the mineral front with good levels of iron, magnesium, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus.  These are all minerals that are frequently deficient in the typical western diet, deficiencies of which can have a negative impact on health.  Chia seeds have also been found to help with weight management, which is down to their high fibre content.  They swell in the stomach which then helps to regulate appetite and feelings of fullness.  Chia seeds are so easy to add to your daily diet and can really get health on track in readiness for Spring.

 

 

So, show your body some love this Valentine’s Day – and every day! It will certainly reward you with improved health.

Stay well.

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Heart health: five foods that support this hard-working organ

 

Organic,Raw,Rolled,Oats,In,Heart,Shape

February is often referred to as the ‘month of love’, for obvious reasons.  However, putting romance aside, we should be loving our hearts all year round. 

Our hearts beat around 100,000 times in a day, working incredibly hard for us.  And there are some great heart-loving foods which support its ongoing health.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares five top foods that support your heart health.

 

Salmon

Salmon is an oily fish, rich in heart-loving, essential omega-3 fats.  The word ‘fat’ often sends alarm bells when people are talking about the heart.  However, the omega-3s are polyunsaturated, with a very different chemical structure to saturated fats, and are absolutely needed for heart health.  The body can’t make omega-3s, hence they need to be eaten regularly in the diet.  The recommended intake of oily fish is two to three portions per week.

Fillet of salmon with some steamed asparagus

Can’t face fish?  Then it’s important to supplement with fish oils, or to eat flaxseeds which are also rich in omega-3s. 

Oats

Oats are loaded with a type of fibre called beta-glucans.  Much research over the years has found that beta-glucans help reduce cholesterol levels.  So much so, that the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has authorised this claim that can be used on beta-glucan containing foods, especially oats.

Porridge topped with bananas and blueberries

Fibre is important for the heart for many reasons. As an example, high cholesterol and fats must be excreted from the body in the stool, so having the bowels working well is also great for the heart.  With February still being rather chilly, there’s no excuse not to enjoy a delicious bowl of warming porridge.  And you can even sprinkle some flaxseeds on the top to really give your heart some love.

Lentils

Quite simply, lentils are rich in potassium, fibre, and folate, all providing support for a healthy heart. Fibre is important for keeping bowels moving and ensuring blood fats are under control.  Importantly lentils are rich in gentle soluble fibre, so they won’t irritate the digestive tract.

Red,Lentils,Dal,In,Black,Bowl,On,Dark,Slate,Table

Folate is important for a process known as ‘methylation’ which the body carries out hundreds of times every day; poor methylation is associated with higher risks of heart disease.  And potassium is really important for encouraging a healthy heart rhythm and keeping blood pressure in check.

If you’ve never had the pleasure of eating homemade dhal, then you’ve missed a treat!  It’s so easy to make and provides an incredible number of heart-loving nutrients too. 

Blueberries

Blueberries are often referred to as a superfood, and for very good reason. Their rich, dark colour means they’re packed with anthocyanins, powerful antioxidants which help protect the heart. Blueberries are also rich in vitamin C, another antioxidant which is very heart friendly. 

A wooden bowl of blueberries

The body is constantly bombarded with environmental free-radicals and from the food we eat.  Hence, nature has provided antioxidants to help protect the body from whatever life throws its way.  Vitamin C can also help reduce cholesterol levels.

Soya beans

Soya beans are also known to reduce cholesterol levels and raise HDL’s (the ‘good ‘cholesterol).  However, not all soya products are created equal, and the greatest benefits come from fermented sources.  In this respect, tofu and tempeh are your friends.  Whilst soya milk and yoghurts, for example, are fine, fermented products have a very beneficial effect on the gut microbiome, which in turn is great for heart health.

Soya milk and solid

It’s important to ensure that any soya products are from non-GMO sources although this isn’t an issue when choosing fermented produce.  Tofu and tempeh are also very low in fat, another plus when thinking about the heart.

So, enjoy the month of love and start introducing more heart-loving foods into your diet.

Stay well.

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Three soups to help support your immunity

A range of bowls of soup

There’s so much being talked about in terms of immunity currently, and for obvious reasons. The immune system needs to be fully supported at this time of year and especially right now.  Whilst it’s never ‘one thing’ that cures all, taking a combined approach is always best. 

What we put into our body nutritionally is very important.  Enjoying an immune-boosting soup is an easy, delicious, and effective way of protecting the body against unwanted invaders.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her three favourite soups to help support your immunity.

The rooted soup

Push back against the same old recipes for chicken broth soup and get the body rooted where it loves to be!  All root vegetables are in season right now and this is no coincidence.  Nature knows what the body needs and provides it at the right time of year.

Root vegetables including turnips, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, kale, parsnips, and onions all work really well in soups.  You can blend them as much as you like, either to create a smooth texture or enjoy as a thicker broth.

A bowl of warming butternut squash soup

Root vegetables are a great source of energising B-vitamins, immune-boosting vitamin C and beta-carotene as well as a range of other antioxidants to help protect the body. You don’t need to over think what you put into the mix with this soup as all the vegetables work superbly together.  And if you haven’t got them all in the larder, that’s no problem either; just use what’s to hand. Spice them up with other roots such as garlic and ginger to really super-charge the immune boost.

The detox soup

Whilst the body has its own, very effective methods, of detoxifying, if the remnants of Christmas over-indulgence are still putting extra stress on the body, then the immune system may be under more threat.  Helping the body to detoxify is going to be really beneficial right now.

A bowl of watercress soup

Foods that encourage liver detoxification include broccoli, garlic, turmeric, and onions.  These ingredients work really well in a soup – you can also add celery which is a natural diuretic.  Additionally, carrots are loaded with beta-carotene which is turned into immune-boosting vitamin A within the body.

You’ve got the perfect range of ingredients; you just need to boil them up with some vegetable stock and add seasoning.

The East meets West soup

Coconut milk is a staple ingredient in many eastern cultures.  It’s generally well-tolerated by all digestive systems and contains plenty of compounds that help to naturally cleanse the body. A coconut curry soup is great for supporting detoxification but also contains many warming spices to naturally support immunity during the winter months. Furthermore, the super-healthy brassica vegetables, cauliflower and kale play a starring role in this tasty soup.

Leek and potato soup in a bowl

You’ll need onions, garlic, vegetable stock, chopped cauliflower and kale, curry powder, ginger, turmeric, and coriander leaves, plus, of course a can of coconut milk. As with most soups, the ingredients just need to be gently simmered until cooked and then the soup is best blended to bring all the delicious flavours together.

A word about spices

Nature has provided an amazing treasure chest of delicious and warming spices which are especially beneficial to the immune system at this time of year.  Why not experiment with their flavours?  Cinnamon, turmeric, cumin, paprika, ginger, garlic, coriander, various curry powders, and garam masala all have a place in daily cooking. 

CLose up of a pestle and mortar surrounded by herbs and spices

They all provide disease-fighting, blood-sugar balancing, digestion-soothing and internal cleansing benefits, so fill up your store cupboard with dried versions so they’re always available.  Also look to use fresh herbs as much as possible.  Your body will certainly thank you for it!

So, enjoy these delicious soups and give your immune system a helping hand at the same time.

Stay well.

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Three nutritional changes to help support your health in 2022

shutterstock_335465993 nutrition words Mar21

A new year always brings plenty of resolutions, especially around health and wellbeing.  However, many fail quickly because we set ourselves targets that are unrealistic.  This can lead to demotivation, and we can struggle to get back on track again. 

However, what if there were three easy nutritional ‘add-ons’ you could make to your diet which would have a direct benefit to your health?

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her three top nutritional tips that everyone can benefit from.

 

Take the veg challenge

A range of vegetables representing fibre

There’s no escaping the fact that vegetables are loaded with essential nutrients, and especially those that are going to protect immunity, notably vitamin C.  Vegetables also contain so much more besides, especially antioxidants, which are incredibly protective of overall health.

Why not challenge yourself to try a new vegetable each week?  If you can get to a farmer’s market or farm shop, your tastebuds will be rewarded.

Close up of woman's hands holding a bowl of warming soup

Try to also be more creative with cooking methods.  Why not boil up some soup – just use any vegetables you have in the fridge with some stock and blend if desired, or enjoy it as a simple, and satisfying chunky broth? 

Most vegetables can be combined happily in many ways; roasting, mashing, steaming, stir-frying to name but a few methods. Even if you’re making a spaghetti Bolognaise, why not add some carrots, peppers, mushrooms, and spinach to the mix?

Add turmeric to everything

wooden spoon with powered turmeric and turmeric root

Turmeric has really carved out a starring role for itself in the botanical health stakes.  There is much research to support its ranking as a ‘super food’, particularly in terms of joint support, liver detoxification, reduction of blood cholesterol levels, brain health and as an all-round anti-inflammatory.

Turmeric was traditionally used in India to spice up curries and is still as popular today.  Turmeric contains active compounds called curcuminoids, the most important one being curcumin. In fact, it can be purchased as a dried spice as either turmeric or curcumin. If taken in supplement form, one that contains extracted turmeric with a high concentration of curcumin is recommended.

Curry dish and rice

In terms of adding turmeric to your cooking, be liberal with it!  Obviously curries and spicy dishes really benefit from using plenty of turmeric.  However, scrambled eggs, savoury pancakes, paella, spicy parsnip soup, or roasted sweet potato wedges all love turmeric too. There’s no shortage of delicious ways to include more turmeric in your diet.

Go for flax

A spoon full of flax seeds

Also called linseeds, flaxseeds are rich in the essential omega-3 fatty acids. We know unequivocally, the UK population are deficient in the essential omega-3 fats; they are called ‘essential’ because the body can’t make them, so they have to be eaten in the diet.

Importantly, omega-3s deliver so many crucial health benefits that if you’re deficient in them you could be struggling with anything from hormone issues, constipation or skin problems to low mood, dehydration, or high blood pressure. Omega 3s are only found in oily fish and flaxseeds in any meaningful amounts, so both are good to add to your diet.

Glass,Of,Yogurt,With,Strawberry,And,Flax,Seeds,On,Color

Whether you have porridge, overnight oats, cereal or natural yoghurt and fruit, there’s space for at least a dessertspoon full of flaxseeds every day. Your body will really thank you for it and you will hopefully notice some great improvements to overall health.

So, enjoy the power of three for some great health benefits in 2022.

 

Stay well.

FOR MORE GREAT DIET AND LIFESTYLE ADVICE:

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For everything you need to know about vitamins, minerals and herbs visit our sister site Herbfacts

All images: Shutterstock