Great British food: five top foods produced locally

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We talk frequently about the health and financial benefits of eating seasonally.  Eating with the seasons provides foods at the time nature intended, meaning they are at their best in terms of nutritional content and flavour.

When it comes to foods that are produced here in the UK, there are many ‘traditionally British’ foods to choose from. 

Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares some of her favourites.

Carrots

One of the greatest nutritional benefits of carrots is their richness in beta-carotene.  Beta-carotene is a very powerful antioxidant, helping to protect us from free radicals which can contribute to some of our nasty degenerative diseases.

shutterstock_250834906 carrots July16

The body converts beta carotene into vitamin A which is needed for healthy vision as well as the maintenance of mucous membranes.  Vitamin A can also help protect us particularly from respiratory infections.

Carrots when in season (and organically grown if possible) taste so much better than at other times of year; they are packed with flavour! However, as carrots do absorb pesticides, always peel and top and tail them if they are not organic.

Chicken

Thankfully there are many farms around the UK that are ‘free-range’. Again, organic is preferable, although the birds are noticeably smaller because they contain less water.

Roast chicken leg with potatoes and vegetables

Either way, chicken is a great source of protein, and the dark meat contains twice as much iron and zinc as the light meat.  In terms of vitamins, chickens contain all the B vitamins (around 85% of the daily recommended intake).  Importantly, chicken is a super-versatile meat and easier on the digestion than red meat.

Natural Yogurt

There are some very well-known yoghurt brands around the UK that produce some great natural products.  For people not allergic or intolerant to dairy, then natural yoghurt that contains live friendly bacteria cultures is great for feeding the gut with probiotics.  These friendly guys are so essential for our overall health and wellbeing.  In fact, every day, there’s new research into our internal gut microbiome and what it needs to keep it healthy.

Natural yoghurt

Yogurt is so easy to add into the daily diet and is especially great for breakfast, maybe on some overnight oats with a few blueberries.  And the good news is that oats are generally produced in the UK too, so you’ve got a very British (or Scottish) breakfast.

Beetroot

One of my all-time favourite vegetables, I could wax lyrical about the health benefits of beetroot all day long!  Essentially, beetroot is great for the immune system (it’s very rich in vitamin C) but also protects the body against carcinogens.

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However, more recently beetroot has been found to help reduce blood pressure and also promote better performance during endurance exercise. Beetroot provides a great natural source of iron and also betaine which is great for liver detoxification.  In fact, there’s not much it doesn’t do!

If you’re feeling below par, you could do a lot worse than have a daily tonic of beetroot juice for a couple of weeks – it’s my ‘go-to’.

Spinach

Contrary to popular belief, spinach isn’t as good a source of iron as folklore has led us to believe.  However, it still contains some, but importantly provides a high concentration of carotenoids, especially beta-carotene and lutein both great for eye health.

A bowl of fresh spinach leaves

Spinach is also a great source of folate, essential for women pre-pregnancy, but useful for all of us in terms of supporting energy levels.  Even better, spinach can easily be added to your daily diet: go for a morning omelette, a lunchtime vegetable soup or gently wilt in a frying pan with a little olive oil, garlic, and nutmeg, as a delicious vegetable side.

It’s always great to support the local economy where possible whilst grabbing some health benefits from British produce at the same time.

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Making the most of seasonal eating in August

Close up of woman holding a bowl of freshly picked plums

Whilst it’s not too difficult to find out which foods are in season and when, it’s not always easy deciding what to do with those foods. 

If you’re lacking in meal ideas, then Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, can help bring some much-needed inspiration to your kitchen.

Venison

Whilst many of us don’t think of venison as being a ‘mainstream’ meat, it’s fantastically nutritious and delicious.  It contains more energising iron than other red meats, provides some healthy omega-3 fats and has less saturated fat than chicken without the skin.

A cooked venison steak on a chopping board

I personally love venison and I keep it really simple by cooking it in the same way as a steak.  For this time of year, I would quickly fry the venison (I like red meat fairly rare). Boil some baby new potatoes with some fresh mint and make a large salad – include some spring onion, also in season right now.  That will take no more than 15 minutes and you’ll have a fabulous meal.

Sweetcorn

Fresh sweetcorn (as corn on the cob) may be a little harder to obtain this year with the drought affecting crops in the UK.  However, if you can find some, then grab it straight away.  Corn has always been a food staple and a relatively inexpensive crop to produce. Corn provides beta-carotene which is turned into vitamin A in the body as needed, immune-boosting vitamin C, energising folate and that all-important fibre.

Summer,Food.,Ideas,For,Barbecue,And,Grill,Parties.,Grilled,Corn

In terms of what to do with corn on the cob, there really is no better way than boiling the kernels until soft to poke with a fork and serving with butter and plenty of black pepper. Corn is also great on the barbecue, but ideally partially cook it first.

Plums

Plums need to be picked at just the right time so they have a little natural sweetness rather than being too sharp. However, they have an amazing array of antioxidants which are so protective of overall health, so it’s worth getting the timings right. Plums are also high in vitamin C and potassium which are both great for heart health and keeping the arteries flexible, allowing good blood flow.

Bowl,With,Oatmeal,,Fresh,Plums,And,Nuts,On,Table

Again, I keep it really simple with plums as I love them on my overnight oats.  Therefore, I stew them with a little honey, keep them in the fridge and then look forward to eating them in the morning.

Mackerel

Mackerel is a wonderfully healthy fish.  It’s packed with omega-3 fats which are generally very deficient in the UK diet but are essential for our health.  Importantly, the body can’t make omega-3 fats, so we must eat them in the diet, at least two or three times per week.

Fresh mackerel with lemon and herbs on foil ready to be baked

Mackerel does have quite a strong flavour and is also quite rich so any sauces with butter don’t really work.  Much better I find are spicy or citrus flavours.  Again, simplicity is the way forward so serve up a super-healthy meal by just adding some new potatoes or basmati rice with tender stem broccoli.

Aubergine

We often associate aubergines (called eggplant by the Americans) with Mediterranean countries as they frequently appear in Greek moussakas and French ratatouille.  As they’re cooked and eaten with the skin-on, you’ll be getting all the real value from the antioxidant-rich anthocyanins in the colourful skin. Aubergines are also a rich source of fibre, and manganese which is great for the bones.

Vegetable,Stew,,Eggplant,,Onion,,Zucchini,With,Tomato,Sauce,,Garlic,And

I absolutely love a simple pasta ratatouille; chop up an aubergine, courgette, onion, garlic, and roast in the oven.  It’s always great to add the tomatoes later in the roasting process. Then add the mixture to some cooked wholegrain pasta, toss with a handful of fresh basil leaves and top with some Parmesan cheese if desired.  And the best news is that this dish provides all of your 5-a-day!

So, enjoy cooking seasonally this August and reap the healthy benefits as well as the delicious flavours on offer.

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Seasonal nutrition: what to eat in July

 

 

shutterstock_404009245 courgette salad July16

The year, as ever, is racing by! However, there’s still plenty of time to enjoy those foods that we associate with summer and that are in season right now.

From delicious fruits to flavoursome vegetables there is nothing better than eating foods as nature intended and at the time of year they are at their most nutritious.

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her top five foods this July

 

Raspberries

Their beautiful pink colour just shouts summer! Interestingly, most of the raspberries sold in the UK at this time of year are produced in Scotland, a place we don’t always associate with summer weather!

Raspberries are a very rich source of vitamin C which is essential for the immune system but also for the muscles, skin, and bones too.  Collagen, the body’s main structural protein needs vitamin C to do its work properly.  It’s a fact, raspberries can help in the fight against the ageing process!

A punnet of fresh raspberries

Raspberries are also high in fibre and antioxidants. Enjoy them with just a light dusting of icing sugar, have some with your morning cereal or overnight oats, add to natural yoghurt or make into a raspberry sauce by pushing them through a sieve.

Runner Beans

Runner beans always seem to be a staple crop for the keen gardeners amongst us.  Despite the initial seed sowing and structure being slightly labour intensive, they seem to be pretty hardy and grow well in our soils. Or maybe they’re so popular down to the beautiful flowers they produce.

A bunch of runner beans on a wooden background

Runners are high in vitamin C and energising folate.  However, when boiled (which is how most people cook them), much of their nutritional value is lost. So always go for steaming to retain more of their nutrition. When fresh, they are also deliciously crunchy eaten raw in salads.

Sea Trout

This needs to be distinguished from river trout which is farmed and not nearly as tasty and nutritionally rich.

Wild sea trout is often referred to as salmon trout, but their flavours are slightly different with sea trout being a little subtler.  In terms of nutritional value, wild sea trout are much pinker than farmed versions because they naturally feed on algae that is loaded with astaxanthin.  It’s what makes them pink but also is one of the most powerful antioxidants known to man. 

Trout with lemon wedges and herb

By eating wild sea trout, you’ll be enjoying all its health benefits. That’s not forgetting that it’s a great source of the amazing and essential omega-3 fats which are needed for the heart, brain, hormones and much more besides. Enjoy sea trout simply plain grilled with lemon butter and Jersey Royal potatoes (also in season).

Turnips

We often think of turnips as winter root vegetables (which they are). However, they tend to be available pretty much all-year round and have a summer harvest too. Turnips make a great vegetable side and can be used instead of parsnips, perhaps roasted with Parmesan and rosemary.

Rustic,Organic,Turnips,With,Fresh,Green,Tops,And,Roots,On

Turnips are rich in fibre so help keep bowels regular, plus they contain the all-important vitamin C.  Even better, turnips are low in fat but provide good energy, together with a bucketful of essential minerals, including calcium for that all-important bone health.

Courgettes

Also known as zucchini to the Americans and Italians, courgettes probably work best when put with some stronger flavours such as feta, tomato and basil or garlic. Courgettes have a high water-content, so can certainly taste rather bland without some flavours to perk it up!

A range of courgettes

Courgettes are a rich source of beta carotene which is a powerful antioxidant.  It’s also turned into immune-boosting vitamin A in the body as needed. They are a good source of the antioxidant lutein which is great for eye health.  With the increase in screen usage over the last few years, we are seeing a real demise in our ability to see long distance, and this is especially noticeable in children and the younger generation.

Why not tempt them with some courgette and mint potato cakes or zucchini fries to help them to like courgettes?

Have a fabulously healthy July and enjoy creating dishes with all the seasonal foods on offer.

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Summer just became simpler! Five easy and nutritious dishes to fuel your summer

Healthy,Diet,Eating.,African,American,Young,Female,Preparing,Salad,In

When it comes to food and meal planning, it’s easy to forget that dishes don’t have to be complicated to be nourishing and, importantly, delicious.

We all want to enjoy the warmer weather rather than spend hours in the kitchen and there are some great dishes that don’t take too long to prepare that will keep your energy up this season.

This National Simplicity Day, Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares five simple, but nutritious dishes to help you enjoy summer even more!

Summer salmon with spicy noodles

Salmon is an oily fish, loaded with the essential omega-3 fats.  They’re essential because the body can’t make them but also because they’re needed for the health of the hormones, joints, eyes, brain, and heart.

Somen,Noodle,With,Teriyaki,Salmon,Sprinkle,With,Scallions,And,Sesame

Simply mix up some miso sauce (great for gut health), balsamic vinegar and paprika, spread over the salmon and grill for around six minutes.  Meanwhile, stir fry some chopped ginger and garlic, and quickly cook the noodles in boiling water.  The drained noodles can then be tossed in the garlic and ginger with some sweet chilli sauce and served with the salmon.  Add some steamed broccoli and you’ve got a perfect meal in around 10 minute

Tasty mushroom pasta

You can use crème fraiche in this recipe as a protein source or oat crème fraiche as a vegan option. Always try to use wholemeal pasta because its nutrient content is far higher than white pasta, especially when it comes to the energising B-vitamins.

Farfalle,Pasta,With,Champignon,Mushrooms,And,Garlic,Creamy,Sauce,On

Fry some onions and garlic, which are loaded with fibre and antioxidants, with mushrooms (a good source of vitamin D).  Once soft, then add either form of crème fraiche with some fresh baby spinach and cook until wilted (about one minute). Spinach is a rich source of iron and folate, essential for DNA repair.

Meanwhile, cook the pasta, combine it all together and you’ve got a delicious meal in around 15 minutes.

Quick beetroot salad

Summer is of course synonymous with salads.  However, it’s always worth bearing in mind that salad vegetables tend to naturally have lots of water and are not as nutrient dense as vegetables.  Therefore, try to add some ‘heavy weights’ into the mix!  Enter beetroot!

Baked,Beetroot,Salad,With,Blue,Cheese,And,Avocado,,CloseupBeetroot delivers so many amazing health benefits especially for the liver and brain health too, down to its betaine content. You can mix and match with this salad but add cooked chopped beetroot to some rocket, with sliced pear, soft goat’s cheese, and a dressing of your choice.  Anything with an olive oil base is going to be great for heart and joint health too. Even better, this dish will only take around 10 minutes to prepare from start to finish.

 

Posh beans on toast

Certainly not the normal ‘beans on toast’ you’d expect, this one contains plenty more nutrients. Use ready-podded broad beans (ones that are free from the tough outer coating) and which are easily bought frozen.  These are then cooked with some green beans. The beans can then be tossed with some pesto and added to toasted ciabatta, spread with either cream cheese or almond nut cream butter (either are great). Finish off with some lightly dressed rocket leaves.

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This dish really is a nourishing and super quick summer meal. Beans are a great protein source, are packed with fibre and immune-boosting vitamin C.  However, some slices of prosciutto add even more flavour and protein. 

Quinoa and pomegranate salad

This dish is actually much more than a salad, providing plenty of protein and much more besides. I talked about beetroot being a heavy weight vegetable; this dish really brings in the full cavalry!

Quinoa is not actually a grain, but a seed and therefore doesn’t upset those of you how may have issues with gluten.  Plus, it’s very high in fibre and protein and quick to boil up with a stock cube.  It takes the same time as rice.  However, when you add plenty of pomegranate seeds, it steps up a level.  Pomegranate is great for heart health but also feeds the beneficial gut bacteria.

Quinoa,Salad,With,Pomegranate,On,Rustic,Kitchen,Table

Simply add these with some chopped coriander, lemon juice, raisins and chopped red onion to the quinoa. Onions also work as a prebiotic fibre, providing great benefits to gut health.

After that, it’s up to you!  Feta, pine nuts, goat’s cheese and walnuts will all provide excellent additions.

Summer cooking has never been so easy and nutritious – enjoy!

 

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Fabulous ‘sides’ to make your barbecue sizzle!

In,Summer.,A,Nice,Couple,Prepares,A,Bbq,To,Welcome

It’s no secret that barbecue season is here – fantastic news for most of us!  However, it’s very easy to get stuck in a rut when it comes to deciding what side dishes to have with the main event.

Bearing in mind that it’s still important to try and make every meal count from a nutritional perspective, then these sides can really pack a punch on that front too.

Clinical nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five favourite sides for your barbecue this summer.

Delicious summer salad

It’s time to think beyond a few green leaves for a summer salad.  Leaves are great and certainly rocket and watercress have many health benefits, both being high in energising folate. However, this one really brings great taste and nutrition too.

Black,Beans,Corn,Avocado,Cucumber,Tomato,Salad,With,Lime,Dressing.

At this salad’s heart are black beans (tinned are easily accessible).  Beans are an often-forgotten protein, and they also contain lots of antioxidants. Add some avocado which is rich in vitamin E, another powerful antioxidant and great for the skin. Include delicious vine ripened tomatoes, sliced red onion (a rich source of health-giving plant flavonoids), cucumber and crumbled feta. Just pour over some dressing of your choice, and if it’s got olive oil as a base, you’ll be getting some benefits for the heart too.  This salad is nourishing, filling, and energising.

Griddled vegetables

Get the taste and feel of the Mediterranean with griddled aubergine, red peppers, onions, courgettes, and tomatoes.  If ever a salad was competing to be colourful whilst packing a nutrient punch, it would win hands down! Once griddled, the veggies can be sprinkled with herbs of your choice but dried or fresh thyme, olive oil, lemon and chopped parsley work really well.

Grilled,Vegetables,In,A,Cast,Iron,Grilling,Pan,,View,From

We know from lots of research that the people who live in Mediterranean countries, or follow the same diet, tend to live longer, and generally suffer with less disease.  The Mediterranean diet is rich in antioxidants which helps to protect the body from damaging free radicals and this salad certainly delivers on this aspect.

Spicy cauliflower

If you like tempura vegetables, you’ll love this recipe.  Many people avoid cauliflower because it can be tasteless and have a soggy texture if over-cooked.  However, cauliflower belongs to the super-healthy cruciferous vegetable family, which all contain amazing compounds that help with liver detoxification and hormone balance.

Moroccan,Tempura-style,Fried,Cauliflower,Florets,Served,On,A,Black,Plate

Whisk up some batter using flour and milk, and add some garlic, which is great for the digestion and heart.  Coat the cauliflower florets in the batter and then some breadcrumbs (homemade or shop-bought) bake in the oven, and then serve with chopped spring onions and some chilli sauce. You don’t even need a barbecue to serve this one up!

Protein kicker salad

This is another dish that can stand alone but also makes a great side to the barbecue, providing plenty of protein (around 20 grams per serving). Many people would traditionally use rice in this one, as it’s a twist on a curried rice salad, but by using quinoa, you’re upping the protein and fibre content. 

Quinoa,Salad,With,Cauliflower,And,Boiled,Eggs,On,A,Vintage

Simply cook the quinoa in some stock, whilst hard-boiling some eggs and frying some onion. Bring everything together with some raisins, chopped coriander, curry paste and ground turmeric.  This dish not only provides some powerful tastes, but the combination of foods is a balanced meal on its own too.

Potato salad Plus

Potato salad can’t really be left off the menu when it comes to planning barbecue sides.  And it doesn’t need to be!  Potatoes are a rich source of immune-boosting vitamin C and fibre, plus they’ll provide loads of sustainable energy too.

Potato,Salad,With,Mayonnaise,And,Spring,Onion,,Selective,Focus

Why not reduce the amount of mayonnaise and add some natural yoghurt instead?  Natural yoghurt is a great source of probiotics which help feed the gut bacteria and support overall health and wellness, not just in the digestive tract.  Plus, adding some spring onions which are packed with antioxidants and work as a natural antihistamine, provide extra support if you happen to be a hay fever sufferer.

So, why not try one or all five of these super salads? Your barbecue just got a whole lot healthier and tastier!

 

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Seasonal eating: enjoy what June has to offer

Fresh,Salad,With,Grilled,Peach,Halves,,Arugula,And,Burrata,On

Some of us are hopefully enjoying traditional warm June weather!  And June also brings a great range of delicious and nutritious foods that are in season right now and therefore should definitely be featuring on your menu.

Eating with the seasons means you are getting foods at their best both in terms of nutritional content and flavour: always check out your local farmer’s markets and farm shops to discover the best foods on offer local to you.

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her top five seasonal foods to be enjoyed this June.

Globe Artichokes

Close up of artichokes

  • They provide a great source of energising folate, heart-loving potassium and immune-boosting vitamin C
  • They seem to have a positive effect on cholesterol levels
  • They help with liver detoxification

Artichoke,,Olive,,And,Roasted,Pepper,Antipasto.,Selective,Focus.

The only question, therefore, is what to do with them!  Globe artichokes are a sightly strange shape and just need a little more preparation than other veggies, but they are well worth the reward. You simply take off the tough outer leaves and base in order to access the prize which is the heart.

Globe artichokes are great eaten cold in a summer salad with vinaigrette.  They are best eaten in season when the leaves are less tough, and the taste is magical!

 

Peaches

shutterstock_297863489 peaches July16

  • They a provide a rich source of vitamin C which is a powerful antioxidant
  • They also deliver plenty of beta-carotene, another antioxidant and great for the immune system
  • They are a great source of fibre and can be really helpful in cases of constipation

Grilled,Peaches,And,Ice,Cream,Dessert,Over,Blue,Plate

Peaches look and smell amazing, and certainly deliver on taste too! When they are at the ripest, they are also the juiciest.  Eat them just as they are or bake in the oven with spices. 

However, as summer is with us, why not include them in a healthy and delicious summer fruit salad with other in-season fruits such as blueberries and strawberries.

Scallops

Raw,Scallops,On,Wooden,Board,On,Wooden,Background

  • They are rich in protein and low in fat
  • They are a packed with the mineral selenium, a powerful antioxidant
  • They are a great source of vitamin B12 which is often deficient in the daily diet

Cooked scallpos on a plate

Scallops are, indeed, nutrient powerhouses! As with most seafood, they contain a wide array of nutrients including the minerals calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium, which are great for the bones, and zinc which fulfils many functions including immune support.

English scallops have a truly amazing taste when in season, as they are now, and need to be only very lightly cooked. They work well with strong flavour such as chorizo or oriental flavours such as ginger, chilli, and lemongrass.

Runner beans

A bunch of runner beans on a wooden background

  • They are a great source of vitamin C and energising folate
  • They provide a good source of fibre
  • They are rich in vegetable protein with around 29% of calories coming from this macronutrient

Three,Bean,Salad,scarlet,Runner,Bean,green,Bean,chickpea

One of the easier vegetables to home grow, runner beans are always best when freshly picked and cooked before they become tough and stringy. They don’t just provide all of the above but also some vitamin K, which is essential for the heart and bones. As with all vegetables, runner beans provide a good balance of essential micro and macro nutrients.

Runner beans provide a perfect vegetable side to almost anything but are especially well partnered with a traditional Sunday roast.  Or combine with other vegetables in a delicious salad. Enjoy whilst you can!

Watercress

A bunch of watercress on a wooden board

  • It’s an excellent source of vitamin C
  • As a member of the wonderful cruciferous vegetable family, it provides lots of protective health benefits
  • It is a great source of the antioxidant beta carotene

A bowl of watercress soup

The only downside with watercress is that you need to eat a reasonable amount to gain these benefits.  That’s why its great to add it to juices as much as possible, create delicious watercress soups, or add liberally to salads.

In traditional medicine, watercress has long been used to treat kidney problems and it makes a great liver detoxifier too. Its dark, green leaves ensure it’s going to provide an array of phytonutrients, all providing loads of health benefits, so load up your plate today!

June provides us with an amazing variety of seasonal foods that can be enjoyed in so many different ways – enjoy!

 

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Super salads for summer

 

shutterstock_179802641 healthy summer salad Aug16

It’s nearly summer which for many of us means salad season!  We tend to associate warmer weather with eating more salads, which is great.  Lots of salad vegetables are in season right now, so it makes sense to be eating plenty.  

It’s very easy to get stuck in a rut with salads; however, this doesn’t need to be the case. Give your salads some love with new ideas, and you’ll love them more too! 

Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her five top super salads.

 

Whilst some people may be lucky enough to be travelling to the Mediterranean this summer, for those with other plans, we can all still enjoy the region’s delicious salad recipes, and which bring great nutritional benefits too. Here are two ideas:

Greek Salad

shutterstock_133631465 greek salad Aug16

It’s hard to beat a traditional Greek Salad; it’s easy to prepare, provides a wealth of nutrients and is delicious too. You just need some beautifully sweet cherry tomatoes, cucumber, green peppers, onions, olives, feta cheese and plenty of mixed herbs to sprinkle.

There’s lots of reasons why there are many populations with longer life expectancy in Mediterranean countries.  Eating these types of foods regularly which are rich in colour and antioxidants, fibre, protein, and immune-boosting nutrients, provides so much of what the body needs and loves on a daily basis.

Bean salad

shutterstock_226518142 bean salad Aug16

Beans of all types are part of the typical Mediterranean diet and are nutrient powerhouses, hence a Mediterranean Bean Salad really hits the spot. Beans are high in protein, fibre, antioxidants, energising B-vitamins and a wealth of minerals that are frequently deficient in the UK population.  It’s much better to choose dried beans and soak them overnight before using, to avoid the additional salt and canning processes if possible. Other than that, it’s a free ride!

Cannellini and kidney beans are great for salads, so just chop plenty of cucumber, peppers, onions, olives, artichokes, sun-dried tomatoes and some feta or mozzarella to partner. Equally, you can add tinned tuna for a real protein hit as well as providing brain-loving omega-3s. And don’t forget plenty of herbs including fresh basil and dried oregano.

There are so many salad combinations which provide a wealth of nutrients – here are another three of my favourites:

The Liver Lover

Beetroot and goats cheese salad

This salad contains beetroot which is effective for liver detoxification.  Beetroot also helps to provide heart-healthy nitric oxide, which is also helpful for performance athletes, as well as providing energising iron and folate.

Delicious halloumi or goat’s cheese creates the perfect partnership and provides protein too. From there, you can let your imagination run wild.  Beetroot always works well alongside some other sweetness – why not try pomegranate and sliced oranges, both full of immune-boosting vitamin C. If you fancy some chopped onion, then go for it but also try adding some fresh mint and your choice of dressing.

Tomato and mozzarella

Delicious,Caprese,Salad,With,Ripe,Tomatoes,And,Mozzarella,Cheese,With

A simple tomato and mozzarella salad, using vine-ripened tomatoes for greater flavour, is a fantastic salad choice. Eating tomatoes with cheese provides fat for the health-boosting carotenoids to be better absorbed.  Lycopene is especially rich in tomatoes and is a powerful antioxidant, great for male prostate health too.  This dish just needs a drizzle of good quality olive oil, some fresh basil torn and scattered on the top, and plenty of salt and pepper to enjoy at its best.

Salmon Salad

Grilled,Salmon,Fillets,With,Lemon,And,Caramelized,Bacon,Served,With

A delicious salmon salad is really going to power up your brain because of the health-boosting omega-3 fats that are rich in salmon. The brain is made up of lots of omega-3 fats, hence you need to eat plenty as the body can’t make them. Try to find wild salmon if you can as this provides more antioxidants and less pollutants.

The salmon fillets can marinate with teriyaki sauce and then be lightly grilled. Meanwhile, fresh rocket leaves, sliced onion and cooked and cooled French beans or asparagus are the order of the day. You can also add tomatoes and Jersey Royal potatoes (in season now). This salad makes a great and easy midweek summer recipe that’s full of vitamin C, fibre and antioxidants which help protect skin against sun damage (amongst their many other amazing health benefits).

Love summer – love summer salads!

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Eating seasonally this May: discover what’s in season and their nutritional benefits

Summer,Salad,With,Potatoes,,Green,Beans,,Asparagus,,Peas,And,Radishes

 

Eating with the seasons is something we nutritionists talk about all the time!  However, whilst we know this to be the best time to eat foods, and as nature intended, we do get used to eating what we want all year-round. 

It’s easy to forget, or not even realise now what’s in season and when. So, here’s a helpful reminder from Clinical Nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer as to what is in season right now.

 

 

Asparagus

Whilst this vegetable provides plenty of nutrients, asparagus is really worth eating when in season and grown in the UK.  For the rest of the year, it often has a woodier and string-like texture. This is also the reason that you tend to see asparagus on restaurant menus much more during May, but the season is short, so grab some quickly.

Grilled,Green,Asparagus,With,Parmesan,Cheese

Asparagus is especially rich in folate, which is important for many different functions throughout the body including red blood cell formation.  Folate is rich in most green vegetables and including as much of this nutrient in your diet as possible is the way to go!

Asparagus is also a mild diuretic meaning it’s great if you struggle with water retention, especially ladies with PMS.

Enjoy it’s taste, texture, and health benefits this May!

Radishes

Radishes are part of the super-healthy cruciferous vegetable family. They are rich in antioxidant minerals such as calcium and potassium which together help lower blood pressure and contribute to reducing risk of many diseases.

Fresh,Summer,Fennel,Salad,With,Pea,Shoots,And,Radishes.,Top

 

Radishes are often popular with dieters as a snack because they are low in calories and fat and have a really delicious peppery taste. They are also great with a plate of crudites and hummus or in an easy summer salad.  If you’ve not ventured to trying them yet, make this month the time!

Sea trout

If you can find some locally to you, you’ll be well rewarded with its taste, texture, and nutritional goodness. Generally, you’ll need to go to the fresh fishmonger’s outlet to find the wild sea trout.  It will be pinker in colour than the farmed variety, because wild trout and, indeed, salmon, naturally eat the algae, astaxanthin, which turns them pink, but also provides amazing antioxidants.

Trout fish fillet with salad

Trout is also rich in omega-3 fatty acids which are essential for overall health, especially the brain, heart, joints, eyes, hormones, and skin.  Sea trout is delicious barbecued or simply grilled with a little butter.

Spring onions

If you’re struggling with allergies right now, then eating some spring onions could really help.  Onions contain a flavonoid called quercetin which works as a natural antihistamine in the body. Onions also provide benefits to the heart, helping reduce cholesterol levels and keeping blood thin, reducing risk of blockages in the arteries.

Potato,Salad,With,Mayonnaise,And,Spring,Onion,,Selective,Focus

 

Enjoy them in a potato salad, in fish dishes or stir fries.  They’re the perfect ‘easy’ vegetable to rev up your health.

Watercress

Another peppery-tasting salad vegetable, this member of the cruciferous vegetable family is equally nutritious.  Watercress is a rich source of folate and is great for liver detoxification. It also helps to support kidney function, so you can really uprate the health benefits by adding this to salads and sandwich fillings.

Ricotta,Cheese,,Green,Peas,,Watercress,And,Dates,Salad

In addition, watercress is rich in immune-boosting beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E.  It’s definitely a summer vegetable to enjoy, so grab some whilst you can when it’s crisp, fresh, tasty, and nutritious.

Seasonal eating is always best when it comes to flavour and nutritional content.  Try to reward the body as much as possible by eating with the seasons this May and indeed throughout the year.

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Seasonal eating: what to eat in April and May

Fresh,Green,Asparagus,Pattern,,Top,View.,Isolated,Over,Green.,Food

Many of us like to know what’s on trend. Likewise, keeping up with what’s in season when it comes to food can have a great impact on our diet and health. 

Unlike other consumer goods, these foods come back into season year after year so that nature can provide the body with what it needs at the right time of year.

Clinical nutritionist, Suzie Sawyer, shares her five favourite in-season foods this Spring.

Asparagus

From a nutritional perspective asparagus is particularly rich in folate, the food-form of folic acid, which is great for energy and producing healthy red blood cells.  In fact, a 100g portion of asparagus produces around three-quarters of the body’s requirement for folate each day, so your energy levels will be supported.

Additionally, asparagus is rich in vitamin C and vitamin E which help support the immune system, together with beta-carotene, also great for immunity.  It’s high in vitamin K which is needed for blood clotting, strong bones, and a healthy heart.

Grilled asparagus wrapped in parma ham

Asparagus is delicious lightly steamed and served with some hollandaise sauce. Another really easy way with asparagus is lightly roasted with a drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper and garlic or tossed with some parmesan cheese.  And for real simplicity, just pop it onto the barbeque sprinkled with a little salt and pepper.

Even better, it’s on many restaurant menus right now, so enjoy it whilst you can!

Spinach

Spinach has a slightly bitter taste which can be off-putting for some people. However, it’ what you put with it that makes all the difference. Spinach is a nutritional powerhouse and can also be added to many dishes to increase nutrient content without being too overpowering.  A good example of this might be a lemon risotto with prosciutto, where other flavours are strong, and spinach doesn’t conflict.

Dish,With,Delicious,Spinach,Risotto,On,Wooden,BoardNutritionally, spinach is packed with immune-boosting beta-carotene and vitamin C (and we need to protect the immune system all year round), plus energising folate. It also contains iron and plenty of health-protective antioxidants.

Plaice

 

Whilst it’s a fairly humble white fish in terms of taste, plaice is still as popular as ever in the UK.  Hopefully you can find some that’s been caught in our waters at this time of year.

Sea,Bream,Fillet,With,Tomatoes,,Green,Olives,And,Capers

Plaice is tasty, moist, fleshy, and high in protein.  As with all white fish, it’s also low in fat and rich in the trace mineral iodine which is frequently lacking in the UK diets and is essential for thyroid function.

For a super-easy and nutrient-rich meal why not tray bake plaice with spinach, olives and tomatoes, for a real Mediterranean treat.

Jersey Royal potatoes

The people of Jersey certainly know a thing or two about growing the most delicious potatoes as they’ve been doing it for over 140 years! It’s all about the soil, climate and careful farming methods that make these potatoes so unique in terms of taste and texture.

Summer,Salad,With,Potatoes,,Green,Beans,,Asparagus,,Peas,And,Radishes

From a nutritional perspective, they are no different to any other potatoes being rich in vitamin C, the B vitamins and fibre.  Plus, the skin is generally eaten with Jersey Royals as it’s so soft, so the fibre content increases.

For the simplest of recipes, enjoy them with a fresh tuna steak salad with hard boiled eggs and, of course, some spinach leaves!

Spring onions

As with all onions, spring onions are packed with flavonoids – plant compounds that provide much nutritional goodness, including antioxidant support. They’re also high in vitamin C, B-vitamins, and fibre.

Pile,Of,Fresh,Spring,Onion,On,Wooden,Table

Spring onions can be added to many dishes to provide some additional flavour without overwhelming the recipe, as can often happen with larger onions.  For example, they’re great added to mash and cheese. Spring onions are also great in stir fries and work really well with ginger, garlic, chopped veggies, and any type of protein.

So, why not get into the habit of eating more seasonally and benefit from eating flavoursome food at it’s best when nature intended.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stay well.

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Top tips for a healthy Easter

 

shutterstock_1676194471 easter family Mar21

For many of us, Easter can often be a time of more food indulgence than Christmas!  With a long weekend, school holidays, plus much-needed holidays planned, it can all amount to a lot more eating.

However, enjoying Easter fayre doesn’t have to mean making unhealthy food choices during the break. Here are many healthy swaps you can make which will be just as tasty.

Clinical Nutritionist Suzie Sawyer shares her five top ways of enjoying healthy Easter food.

 

Delicious asparagus sprinkled with Parmesan

Whilst all vegetables taste much better when eaten seasonally, asparagus stands out from the crowd in this respect.  Asparagus that has travelled halfway around the world to the supermarket storeroom is often tough and tasteless.  However, English asparagus is now just coming into season this Easter, and it is delicious!

Grilled,Green,Asparagus,With,Parmesan,Cheese

Asparagus boasts many health benefits. It’s high in energising B-vitamins, especially folate, vitamin C and other antioxidants.  Importantly, asparagus helps feed the good gut bacteria that is so critical our overall health.

Even better, it’s so simple and quick to cook.  Roast in the oven for around 10 minutes in a little olive oil and serve either as a starter or side sprinkled with Parmesan cheese. 

Easter pancakes for all the family

Children and adults alike love pancakes whatever time of year, so Easter is a great excuse to enjoy them.  What’s more, pancakes are great for fussy eaters because they provide an energy dense, protein-rich breakfast to keep sugar levels in check. It’s also another great way of encouraging the whole family to enjoy more fruit by adding some bananas and blueberries.

Pancakes,With,Berries,And,Maple,Syrup,For,Breakfast,On,A

And for those with sensitivities to gluten (or just wanting a different taste), why not make them with buckwheat? Despite its name, buckwheat is gluten-free and produces some very delicious, slightly nutty-flavoured pancakes.  Enjoy with fruit and a dollop of natural yoghurt.

Chocolate

It’s no surprise that there’s lots of chocolate around at Easter!  However, many people don’t realise that dark chocolate contains some great health benefits. Dark chocolate is packed with super-healthy polyphenols which are powerful antioxidants.  The polyphenols also help manage high blood pressure, as well as providing other health benefits.

Chocolate,Strawberries,With,Chocolate,Syrup,Close,Up

If you’re not quite ready to ditch the traditional milk chocolate Easter eggs, why not serve a slightly healthy dessert using strawberries dipped in melted chocolate.  That way, you’ll be doubling up on antioxidant power with the fruit and chocolate and will be supporting the immune system too.

Cruciferous vegetables

The family of cruciferous vegetables include Brussels sprouts, kale, broccoli, and cauliflower.  Whilst many will be happy to hear that Brussels are not in season right now, the traditional Easter Day roast could really benefit from some delicious cauliflower.

Baked,Cauliflower,Steaks,With,Herbs,And,Spices,On,Baking,Sheet

Cauliflower is a very healthy vegetable, containing loads of fibre, vitamins, and minerals, together with plant compounds that help protect the body from serious disease.

What to give your cauliflower some extra flavour?  Why not toss the heads in olive oil, lemon and crushed garlic and roast in the oven? Garlic is another superfood and is especially healthy for the heart and immune system.

You can have turkey at Easter too!

Many of us have been programmed to have turkey at Christmas time and rarely throughout the year.  However, over recent years, many people have taken the opportunity of enjoying turkey over the Easter holidays too.  And it will bring plenty of health benefits.

Stuffed,Turkey,Breast,With,Baked,Vegetables,And,Spices,On,A

Turkey is naturally low in fat, so it wins hands down when put alongside traditional Spring lamb. Plus, turkey is slightly lower in calories but higher in protein than chicken. It also contains much more of the immune-boosting mineral zinc than chicken. A turkey crown is an even lighter option, with very little fat and no wastage.

Have a wonderfully, healthy Easter and enjoy some of these delicious and nutritious foods along the way!

Stay well.

FOR MORE GREAT DIET AND LIFESTYLE ADVICE:

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